News Crispin Blunt has survived an attempt by worthies in his local party to get rid of him

Some local ladies were offended by the way that Blunt’s marriage ended

Professor John Rex: Noted scholar of race relations

Professor John Rex was a leading figure in British sociology, chairing departments at various universities and founding two, at Durham and Warwick. A leading scholar in the field of race or ethnic relations in the UK, he participated in comparative and collaborative studies on the topic in Europe and elsewhere and was well-known internationally for his work in this area, and as a theorist of social conflict.

This Is Life, By Dan Rhodes

Comic writer Dan Rhodes likes to spend time in the company of young French women. He has even posed as one. Under the nom de plume Danuta de Rhodes, his 2004 novel, The Little White Car, told the story of Veronique, whose Fiat Uno was allegedly involved in the accident that killed Diana.

This is Life, by Dan Rhodes

A scatty tale of lust, art, and wild Parisians

Talent Scout: Jordan Rhodes, Huddersfield Town 

As the January transfer window began to reach towards its frivolous, panic-buying climax this week, the gap between the top and bottom of the league systems hit home, as fans desperately scrambled to raise £50,000, the average weekly wage of a Premier League footballer, to save 128 years of history at Conference outfit Darlington FC, who were minutes from extension.

Between The Covers: New Year detox, The maths of The Simpsons, and the year ahead

Your weekly guide to what's really going on in the world of books

Four-star Rhodes rides to the rescue

Sheffield Wednesday 4 Huddersfield Town 4

Billie Jo Spears: Country singer who scored her biggest hit with 'Blanket on the Ground'

Many artists have a "career record", a song which becomes so well-known that it swamps anything else they do. With Billie Jo Spears, it was her 1975 single, "Blanket on the Ground", a song which suggested putting the romance back into a marriage. "It became controversial," said Spears, "as many of the listeners thought I was singing 'sleep around' instead of 'slip around'. The country fans thought it sounded like a cheating song, and they don't like girls who sing cheating songs." With a few more plays, everyone realised what the song was about and it became an international bestseller.

The physical strain is etched on the faces of Iain Percy (right) and crew Andrew Simpson

Double injury blow for British sailing hopes

Injuries have hit British medal prospects at the world championships of sailing in Fremantle. Double Olympic gold medallist Iain Percy was brought ashore in agony today when suffering back spasm pains which he fears have forced him out of a bid for a second world championship title in the Star two-man keelboat.

O'Dowd on love: 'I've learnt from experience how difficult it was to seduce a woman, so I cling on'

Chris O'Dowd: From 'hunchback' to Hollywood heart-throb

The newly desirable actor talks to Genevieve Roberts about how he fell down a rabbit hole into a Wonderland of A-list movies

Harlem is Nowhere, By Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts

Seldom was a neighbourhood so watchable

Harlem Is Nowhere: A Journey To The Mecca Of Black America, By Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts

Few urban districts in the world trail such a rich train of associations as Harlem in New York. Described as a City of Refuge, the Cultural Capital of Black America and the epicentre of the Jazz Age, the area has also been characterised as a ruin, a prison and a ghetto devoid of hope. In her remarkable and beautifully written debut, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts navigates these complex and contradictory histories. Moving – or dancing – between memoir, folklore, literary criticism and psychogeography, she hymns this city within a city, a place at least as populated with utopian aspirations and abandoned dreams as with people.

On The Front Foot: Trent Bridge is actually 2,000th Test – and the Rest is not history

It has been widely publicised that the Test match in progress at Lord's is the 2,000th. Poppycock, of course. The occasion has been wonderful and Lord's has been characteristically grand even when it has been tipping down, but it has not been the extra-special event we have been led to believe by the International Cricket Council.

Audiobooks for summer: The sound of Little Hands Clapping

Franz Liszt, born 200 years ago, was a phenomenal child-prodigy and the greatest pianist of his day.

Old Robsonians' six-a-side heroes are still going strong after 15 years

The Independent charity auction winners have lifted 11 titles in seven years, had Shilton as their coach and even represented England. Sam Cunningham finds out how they do it
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003