Arts and Entertainment The Man with the 10 Stone Testicles

It's rude to gawk, but there's something worthwhile in these stop-and-stare documentaries

Little sympathy as Dahl clan seeks a shedload of cash for author's hut

The family of Roald Dahl has been forced to backtrack on a fundraising campaign designed to rescue the hut in which the author wrote his tales.

You can pay to move your own shed, Roald Dahl fans tell writer's family

His children's books have sold 60 million copies, generating a merchandise industry and Hollywood adaptations. But an appeal for £500,000 to restore Roald Dahl's garden shed has proved a plot twist too fantastical.

99 Days out for the family: The big events 13-40

There's plenty of waterside fun to be had this summer.

99 Days out for the family: See a show 90-99

Catch the last three dates in Birmingham Hippodromes's Six Summer Saturdays free programme of city-centre events, which runs until 13 August. Performances include street theatre, interactive brass bands, circus acts and acrobatics, as well as comedy and upside down painting (sixsummersaturdays.com).

Lost in Shangri-La: Escape From a Hidden World, By Mitchell Zuckoff

Meat on the bones of a blockbuster

Forgotten Author No 64: John Burke

How can you be forgotten if you've deliberately avoided having an identity to begin with? That's the challenge of pinning down John Burke's work.

Roald Dahl's Twisted Tales, Lyric Hammersmith, London

Theatre is on a roll with Roald at the moment. The RSC's Matilda has just received a gong at the Critics' Circle Awards, the presenter fulsomely declaring it to be the best new British musical that he had witnessed in 27 years of reviewing. But this new stage version of some of the author's aimed-at-adults Tales of the Unexpected at the Lyric Hammersmith strikes me as more than a couple of shudders short of the full Dahl. I have only two problems with it. I hate the stories themselves and I find the theatrical adaptation of them largely spurious in the chills department.

The Gruffalo, Garrick Theatre, London

In the 10 years since it was published, The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson (story) and Axel Scheffler (pictures) has become a much-loved classic, proving that big furry creatures who roar can be kind at heart, and a mouse may look at a monster, just as a cat may look at a king.

Matilda, Courtyard Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

Top marks for the gifted schoolgirl

Anarchy in the UK: Aussie comic Tim Minchin is fomenting childish revolt after getting his hands on Roald Dahl

His musical of Roald Dahl's 'Matilda' for the RSC opens one night, his UK arena comedy stand-up tour the next. Is it any wonder Tim Minchin is going ape?

Once upon a time, there was a man who liked to make up stories ...

With their tiny heroes and cruel villains, books by Roald Dahl never date

Sales soar as talking books mark 75 years

What began as a public service for blinded First World War veterans is now a major publishing success story

Storyteller: The Life Of Roald Dahl, By Donald Sturrock

A mere 16 years ago, Jeremy Treglown wrote a well-reviewed biography of Roald Dahl. Yet Dahl's daughter Ophelia asked Donald Sturrock to do the job again – fulfilling a task her father had assigned her: to write his life story or appoint someone else. In a 2002 interview, Ophelia said Treglown's book portrayed her father as "a difficult, demanding, unpleasant old bugger... it didn't show his funny, kind side." This time the family, which granted access to letters and papers, also did not interfere. They asked only that Sturrock conveyed the man that he knew and liked. He has succeeded.

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