News Hanging Rock is under threat

Protest meetings – and even a protest picnic - held at the site as petition with 5,000 signatures urges council to reconsider

how to load a juke-box

How to load a juke-box. Sounds easy doesn't it? If you are lucky enough to have recently acquired a juke-box, or have always dreamed of owning one, then you might think that all you've got to do is load up with your favourite 50 or 100 singles and you're ready to go, right?

ROCK: A show of two halves, Rod

OUR first sight of Rod Stewart was not of him in a glittering black jacket and drainpipes, or in a checked Dr Who coat, or in a pale blue suit with black and white loafers - although all these outfits and more would follow. First we saw him in a tracksuit. On the video screens above the stage he was doing his football training, before nipping home to change his baby's nappy, and then wheeling an overflowing trolley out of Tesco's. "I told Rachel I didn't have time to do this," he tuts to the camera, and promises us that he'll get to the concert eventually. It's a testament to his showmanship that even his intro was more entertaining than most artists' gigs.

Big spender with a playboy image

Prince Jefri Bolkiah, the flamboyant finance minister of the oil- rich kingdom of Brunei, is by far the less reserved of the two main Brunei royals. Yesterday's purchase of Asprey's - of which he was a big client - is the latest in a string of private investments which have earned him a playboy image.

Running a successful club is harder than it looks, say the veterans of London's clubland

Johnny Gold, Tramp (founded 26 years ago)

The Rimini Romeo calls it a day at 6,000 lovers

ANDREW GUMBEL

A tale of pagan burial

Robin Hardy's The Wicker Man was declared 'unscreenable', hacked, then Rod Stewart tried to have it burnt. Ryan Gilbey on a cult one-hit wonder

Pensions may mark political divide

IT IS, of course, an enormous political story, but it is not much of an economic one. Or so you might assume from the pretty muted response of the financial markets to the announcement by John Major on Thursday - the markets seemed more surprised, for heaven's sake, by the news of the impending retirement of Douglas Hurd the next morning.

Choice: NICK COLEMAN

Englebert Humperdinck and Jimmy Page are now virtually indistinguishable. Just look at the fly-posters advertising Englebert's current tour, which commences in Edinburgh this week, and tell me I'm not a loony. Suspicion is further heightened by the fact that the coming Page / Plant reunion tour of the UK in no way overlaps with Hump's.

Rod Stewart sets record straight

As more calls come to regulate the press, the rock star Rod Stewart made a convincing case yesterday for measures to control interviewees, writes David Lister.

Dervishes: in a whirl of their own

THE DERVISHES flung off their black robes and began to revolve. In long white woollen shrouds and little red hats shaped like Islamic tombstones, heads tipped to one side, one palm up and one down, they whirled to the frenzied chainsaw chant of their leader. Sara Nuttall, our earnest guide to the Music of the Silk Road (R3), was clearly impressed. She described with fastidious care what she saw and heard on the first leg of her journey from Istanbul to China, and it sounded amazing.

ROCK: Reprobate goes for full baptism

IF POP is principally about sex, then INXS, with their sultry frontman, Michael Hutchence, are its perfect expression, and his magnetism drew wannabe groupies of both genders to a hastily convened gig at Brixton Academy.

Rainbow in line to recover its musical colours

FOR the generation of peace-loving 1970s music fans who sat on the top of a hill in the Isle of Wight and listened to music for free - the authorities had erected the perimeter fence at the foot of the hill, not realising that the acoustics would be better when heard from on high - the news that the Rainbow Theatre in London is about to reopen as a live-music venue has done more to recall the world of joss- sticks and Afghan coats than any other event in recent years.

He'll never let you down: The Seventies may have been a terrible decade for pop music, but in retrospect, one man, Rod Stewart, stands out as a mentor for the young: a man of questionable taste in almost everything, except good pop music

YOU WANT classic early Seventies albums, I got 'em. The entire Al Green back catalogue, Let's Get It On, There's No Place Like America Today, Grievous Angel, After the Goldrush, Blood on the Tracks . . . Unimpeachable classics, every one, and while others may have to bury their Cat Stevens and James Taylor albums away when fashionable friends come round to borrow a cup of balsamic vinegar, I have nothing to hide. Those pre-Ramones years were difficult to pick your way through, but I seem to have managed it quite brilliantly. If there was a smarter, more forward-thinking, more retrospectively modish young teenager around than me between 1971 and 1975, I have yet to meet him.

Who's the prat in the white tuxedo?: Isabel Wolff at the Rock Circus, London's fastest growing tourist trap

INSIDE the entrance of the Rock Circus in Piccadilly, London, foreign students throng in their jeans and bomber jackets. 'Who's that over-dressed prat?' I wondered, staring at a man in a white tuxedo, leaning casually against the far wall. Closer inspection revealed that it was an eerily accurate model of Bryan Ferry. But although the Rock Circus is owned by Madame Tussaud, the people who run it are at pains to point out that it's not merely a waxworks, but a celebration of 40 years of rock music.
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