Sport

The pair were picked up Norwegian freighter en route for Rotterdam after previous attempts to help them failed

Letters: England's key inventor

DECCA Aitkenhead is near the truth ("Time taps adieu to the typewriter", 13 August). Pellegrino Turri of Castelnuovo devised a writing machine for the blind Countess Carolina Fantoni da Fivizzono in 1808. However, credit is probably due to England. It was Henry Mill, an engineer from Sussex, who in 1714 patented an "artificial machinefor the impressing or transcribing of letters, singly or progressively as in writing, whereby all writings may be engrossed on paper or parchment so neat as not to be distinguished from print."

Lampard leads British challenge

Equestrianism

Finger-picking good

The range of flamenco and its offshoots has never been greater, from the diminishing band of old southern Cante Jondo singers and their stylistic heirs, through an array of modernisers and flamenco-rock groups to art-house dance troupes and concert-hall virtuosi. Paco Pea's niche in the spectrum is indicated by a part-time position he holds as Professor of Flamenco at Rotterdam Conservatory. Pea is learned, non-gypsy and international, dividing his time between homes in north London and his native Crdoba, where he organises a highly esteemed guitar festival and workshop.

Salary accelerator works for Persil Power chiefs

The man behind what has been described as Unilever's biggest marketing setback has become the group's highest-paid director.

PREVIEW OF WOMEN'S WORLD DOUBLES CUP

TENNIS: SPORTING DIGEST

Wright on target early for Slough

HOCKEY

Learning to live with the city

l The Reith Lectures l The architect Richard Rogers argues that the decaying fabric of urban life must be transformed into a sustainable, civilising environment - if we are to avert catastrophe

Flood refugees return home

Tiel - Dutch refugees poured back to their precarious polder life yesterday; 250,000 refugees were given the go-ahead to return; and about 70,000 had been allowed to go home in previous days. Most returnees crowded roads pulling their most treasu red belongings in trailers and campers.

Pretty in pinkku, big in Japan

David Nicholson samples a season of sex movies, Japanese-style

Obituary: Jan Tinbergen

Jan Tinbergen, economist: born The Hague 12 April 1903; staff, Central Bureau of Statistics, The Hague 1929-36, 1938-45; part-time Professor, Netherlands School of Economics (now Erasmus University), Rotterdam 1933-55, Professor of Development Planning 1955-73 (Emeritus); Director, Central Planning Bureau, The Hague 1945-55; Nobel Prize for Economics 1969; Professor of International Co-operation, University of Leiden 1973-75; married 1929 Tine De Wit(three daughters, and one daughter deceased); died 9 June 1994.

Travel: Behind the times

AT LEAST the cover photograph of the new national railway timetable, which comes into effect tomorrow, shows, accurately, a deserted Waterloo International station. And, in keeping with the delay in establishing a rail link through the Channel tunnel, Table 350 (London to Brussels and Paris) is ominously blank. But in case you thought you would take a ferry instead, beware of Table 305 (London to Rotterdam and Amsterdam, change at Sittingbourne). The ferry link upon which it is based, from Sheerness to Vlissingen, shut down a fortnight ago.

Racism tests the tolerance of the Dutch: Far right to make more gains this week

FOUR mothers sit chatting in the spring sunshine on the terrace of the municipal creche. One is white, one black, one Turkish, one Indian. This is the traditional image of the Netherlands: an easy-going, racially integrated society, where the state provides amply for all and citizens live convivially in a climate of enlightened tolerance.

Dutch poll seeks to fill vacuum left by Lubbers: Immigration and the welfare state loom large in Tuesday's elections, writes Sarah Lambert in The Hague

THE NETHERLANDS is preparing to end an era. The Prime Minister of 12 years, Ruud Lubbers, is stepping down, leaving a political vacuum that the contenders for power in Tuesday's national elections are struggling to fill.

Dawsongroup chairman to lead European drive

PETER DAWSON, who owns 73 per cent of Dawsongroup, the truck leasing and distribution company, is to relinquish the executive chairmanship to take charge of the push into Europe, writes John Murray.

Obituary: Ien Dales

Ien Dales, politician, died Utrecht 10 January, aged 62. Appointed Dutch Home Affairs Minister in Ruud Lubbers' centre-left coalition cabinet in November 1989. Negotiated wage deals with the powerful civil service unions and acquired a reputation for driving a hard bargain. Previously Director of Social Services for Rotterdam (1977-81), State Secretary for social affairs (1981-82) and mayor of the eastern city of Nijmegen (1987-89).
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003