Voices

It's enjoyable, and its intentions are beautiful, but if the show wants to depict the reality of life as a gay person in today's world, it is far off the mark

Big night out: How movie fans stole the show

A new breed of cinema-goers is here: they dress up, quaff cocktails and applaud the stars. Forget quiet trips to the movies – this is the future, says Alice Jones

Love Letters of Great Men – for real

There is scene in the film Sex and the City that has sent its mostly female fans crowding into bookshops, only to emerge empty-handed. Carrie Bradshaw, played by Sarah Jessica Parker, is lying in bed next to her lover, Mr Big (Chris Noth), reading extracts from an interesting-looking book called Love Letters of Great Men.

Zany distraction that became starting blocks for a gold rush

It was more than just a final here yesterday. More than just two semi-finals. Who would have imagined six years ago, when Twenty20 finals day at Hampshire's ground was just a zany distraction from the serious side of the authentic game.

Sarah Sands: We have blemishes. The famous have signature moles

Oliver Cromwell instructed his portrait painter, "Warts and all." But then he was never subjected to the same level of facial scrutiny as Sarah Jessica Parker. The removal of a mole from the actress's chin has provoked internet concern. The website Sarah Jessica Parker Looks Like a Horse, which monitors her appearance carefully, was on to it fast.

Levi's profit plunges 98 per cent as young shun its jeans

Levi Strauss's second-quarter net income plunged 98 per cent because of weak sales of Dockers and Levi's. The company – which began making its famous jeans in San Francisco in 1853 and which is one of the world's largest brand names in clothing – is considering moving its headquarters and all 1,000 employees across the Bay Bridge to Oakland to save money.

Family inheritance: Revenge of the stepmothers...

It started with a column in which she described herself as a 'fairy-tale baddie'. Now Sam Baker has been offered a six-figure advance for a novel about women who become stepmums

Joan Smith: Vicious criticism of Hillary could deter future candidates

She has had to endure months of sniping, mostly in the form of spiteful personal remarks. They said she was too old, not up to it, and some of the attacks were so vicious that they made her cry. In the end, though, Carrie Bradshaw triumphed over Indiana Jones, with the movie version of Sex and the City taking an impressive £2.1m in British cinemas on its first day.

There's a new genre in Tinseltown, and it's all about female friendship

Blockbusters are Hollywood's favourite films, right? Wrong. There's a new genre in town that has turned conventional wisdom about cinema-goers on its head. While male teenagers still make up the biggest audience in US cinemas (hence the endless array of superhero/cop/ disaster themes), women are demanding films that they want to see – and they are starting to get them.

'Sex and the City' hoping to whip Indiana Jones

This weekend's box-office battle between the year's top two films is firmly divided along gender lines. But can Carrie and co win the day?

Sex and the City, 15

The big-screen follow-up to the hugely successful television series will delight fans, but leave the uninitiated baffled

Sex and the City (15)

A girls' night out too far

Smart People, 15<br />Charlie Bartlett, 15

After this glut of Smart and Smarter comedies, bring back the stupid people

Smart People (15)

Some smart lines, at any rate, and fine performances from Dennis Quaid, as a crotchety widowed professor (borrowing a gut and a rolling, flat-footed walk from brother Randy), Ellen Page as his precocious, preppy daughter, and Thomas Haden Church as his freeloading slob of a brother, who turns out to be surprisingly dependable.

Pandora: Kelly preserves her modesty

Kelly Osbourne, daughter of Sharon and vacuum cleaner-voiced Ozzy, has declared celebrity jihad on The London Paper afternoon freesheet after it published a photo of her, thighs akimbo, in the back of a cab. On the evening in question, Osbourne had been weaving tiredly about the Polynesian-themed nightclub Mahiki (favoured by Sloanes and the royal set) and was later seen carefully inspecting the craftsmanship of brickwork on a wall next to her house.

Leading article: Welcome back

Hype is, of course, as essential to the Hollywood cocktail as vodka is to a Cosmopolitan. And barely a year goes by without a new film being heralded as a triumph that has skewered a zeitgeist like the heel of a Manolo Blahnik descending on a red carpet. But there is something about the release of the Sex And The City film, which premiered last night in London, which does feel rather momentous; and not just for the armies of fans of the long-running and award-winning US television series, but, in some way, for gender relations too.

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