News

The privately-launched Cygnus cargo ship delivered critical supplies as well as long-awaited gifts from the astronauts' families

Space satellites to study effect of Sun's lethal wind

A flying formation of four identical satellites will be launched by the European Space Agency later this month to watch the weather in space and study the effect on the Earth of storms on the surface of the Sun.

Observation tower offers a global perspective

The public could be given the opportunity to get a glimpse of deserts, savannah or rainforests several thousand miles away without having to travel further than London.

Letter: Sports reports

From Mr Scott Banks

Boom time for the evangelists

About 200 people a day are joining churches in the spiritual 1990s and offsetting the number leaving disillusioned. Figures in the latest edition of the UK Christian Handbook show most of the growth is in evangelical churches.

Granada considers satellite channel

BY TOM STEVENSON

A lesson in mocking the afflicted

The Nineties so far have seen an enormous growth in the business of meta-television - TV that's about TV and nothing else. And here comes Peter Richardson's The Glam Metal Detectives (9pm BBC2). About 20 minutes of each show is a channel-hopping parody of satellite TV, sandwiched around instalments in the adventures of the Glam Metal Detectives themselves.

Blowin' in the supersonic wind

Storms on the Sun can create havoc here on Earth. A new project will in vestigate their causes. Peter Bond reports

Ariane take-off

First Edition

First issue

The Asian Age, a new newspaper for Britain's two-million- strong Asian community, is launched today using satellite technology to receive news published in Delhi and Bombay.

Ariane fails

Europe's 63rd Ariane rocket carrying two French-made satellites failed to reach oribit after launch, Reuter reports from Kourou, French Guiana. 'The third stage stopped working in flight,' Charles Bigot, Arianespace's president, said. It was the first failure in 28 launches.

Space calling earth

The European Space Agency has developed technology to transmit data directly from one satellite to another using lasers. This will allow a satellite to transmit direct to its controlling earth station via another satellite rather than via different earth stations. The agency plans to launch a telecommunications satellite, Artemis, in 1996 with an optical laser terminal for exchanging data with other satellites. The first test of the technology will come when the Spot 4 remote-sensing satellite is launched in 1997. Because of its orbit, Spot 4 would not be able to send its image data to any one ground station for more than 10 minutes at a time. When linked to Artemis, it will be able to transmit direct to its earth station in France.

Offer to take Nu-Swift private: Deal values USM-listed fire extinguisher company at pounds 147m

JACQUES MURRAY, the millionaire French entrepreneur, yesterday tabled a formal offer to take Nu- Swift, the USM-quoted fire extinguisher company, private, writes Neil Thapar.

Scientists find way of detecting space junk

(First Edition)

Satellite TV criticised over sex and violence: Broadcasting Standards Council calls for more controls

SATELLITE television should exercise more control over how much sex, violence and bad language it screens, the Broadcasting Standards Council said yesterday on the publication of two new monitoring studies.

Letter: Beyond powers of Swift

TV CRITIC Allison Pearson ('Shock, horror, spoof, shame', 4 April) claims that Jonathan Swift wrote A Modest Proposal in 1792. Such a feat would have been beyond the powers of even Swift, who died in 1745.
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Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before