News

Craig Cobb dismissed the DNA results as 'statistical noise'

Agenda: Oliver Sweeney; Tyson; Calling London; The Long Table; Rampart

Fashion: Best foot forward

Fifa's president, Sepp Blatter, and the other 204 member nations must look at the home nations and mutter, 'Who the hell do they think they are?'

The Last Word: Here's why we are part of the problem

While the UK associations wield so much power they, and the game of football, will be the losers

Fabulous Christmas gift ideas: Stockists

The art of giving

Cloud cover: the Caldera de Taburiente

Star struck: Above the clouds in the Canaries

From volcanoes and ancient forests to the stars in the night sky, there's plenty to lure adventurous families to the steep little island of La Palma.

Nick Clegg, at Leeds College of Building yesterday, to launch The Youth Contract

Osborne gives free schools £600m to boost maths teaching

A £600m programme to create 100 free schools will be announced by the Chancellor, George Osborne, in his Autumn Statement on Tuesday.

Frank Lampard's 'goal' against Germany at the 2010 World Cup forced Fifa to act

Arsene Wenger supportive of goal-line technology

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger would welcome goal-line technology and more - sooner rather than later.

The Arcelor Mittal Orbit sculpture

Designed by Anish - built by Kirk, Matt, Andy, John and Wayne

Standing nearly twice as tall as the Olympic Stadium, the crazed and twisted steelwork of the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower is an undeniably impressive piece of engineering. Consider that it was bolted together by just three men, and its loops and spirals seem more imponderable than ever.

The best of popular science: Astronomer Nicolas Copernicus

Science & Nature: Planetary possibilities

Occasionally, works of intellectual originality arise from the ferment of popular science writing. One such is David Deutsch's The Beginning of Infinity (Allen Lane, £25), which goes against the pessimistic grain of the times in suggesting that the scientific project begun in the 17th century has limitless possibilities and that the problems pressing on us now are all eminently soluble.

Natasha Jonas: 'My nan worries about me getting hurt but she knows I can look after myself'

Natasha Jonas: Blazing a trail for female fighters

Liverpudlian has high hopes of being one of the first women to win an Olympic boxing medal, she tells Robin Scott-Elliot

Last Night's Viewing: The Manor Reborn, BBC1<br></br>Living with the Amish, Channel 4

I'm Penelope Keith and it strikes me that I might have bitten off more than I can chew," said Audrey fforbes-Hamilton at the beginning of The Manor Reborn, a new series in which the National Trust has outsourced the refurbishment of one of its properties to a team from the BBC, in return (one assumes) for a bit of much needed publicity.

Lawrence forensic evidence 'may have been contaminated'

Sellotape used to seal bags containing suspects' clothing had become ineffective, admits expert

Unmanned technology takes off for the weapons industry

High-ranking military officers and their aides mingled with salesmen and potential customers at the 11th annual drones conference. Some had paid as much as £3,000 to attend Unmanned Aircraft Systems 2011, a two-day event that opened on 16 November in a plush hotel in Kensington, west London.

Net migration figure reaches record high

David Cameron's promise to slash the number of people moving to Britain suffered a fresh setback yesterday when net migration hit a record annual high of more than 250,000.

Leading article: In praise of compulsory history lessons

That half of Britons in their early twenties do not know that the Romans built Hadrian's Wall, or that Nelson led the British to victory at Trafalgar, is evidence of young people leaving school "woefully undernourished" in history, Michael Gove lamented yesterday. Absolutely right. But the Education Secretary should resist the inevitable Tory temptation to take the National Curriculum back to a focus on Kings and Queens.

Shared stories: Caroline Moorehead

Biography: Near-deaths and divine rebirths

Year after year the book trade proclaims the death of the Big Biography. Year after year it rises from the grave. Why? Because the best of its practitioners follow where their talent leads, not where trends demand.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us