News

Craig Cobb dismissed the DNA results as 'statistical noise'

Boris Johnson speaks at the Conservative Party conference in Manchester

Boris Johnson warns of need for air hub

Britain faces "economic stagnation" unless another major airport is built in south-east England, London Mayor Boris Johnson said today.

The calm authority of Frozen Planet is a timely reminder of BBC at its best.
Paul Gallagher celebrates Leicester’s third goal with David Nugent

Gallagher produces stunning welcome for Pearson's return

Leicester City 3 Crystal Palace 0

Derelict houses are going for a song

Can Motor City restart its engines?

Long regarded as a synonym for urban decay, the battered city of Detroit has begun to flex its economic muscles again. But the process of regeneration is only just beginning, reports David Usborne

Ivan Martin: Jirous Stalwart of the Plastic People of the Universe

A legend of the post-war dissident movement in his native Czechoslovakia, Ivan Martin Jirous was a poet and mainstay of the psychedelic rock group the Plastic People of the Universe.

Katy Guest: I'm no Brian Cox, but I know my skin keeps the water out

You may call this a First World problem and tell me that I watch too much TV, but I am fed up with being blinded by "science". It happens because perceptions of the term are disconcertingly polarised. There's the serious science that nobody really understands: Brian Cox and his Cern pals whizzing round a tunnel underneath Switzerland; and then there's the bogus kind: Jennifer Aniston looking wide-eyed at a Big Bang of hairspray molecules while a male voiceover explains "the science bit" behind the extraordinary shininess of her hair. In 50 years, the public perception of "science" has barely moved on, it seems. While wild-haired male geeks make profound but inexplicable progress experimenting with neutrons in a distant lab, women in commercials still stand astounded as men in white coats patiently explain the sudsiness of their washing powder.

Basil D'Oliveira meets the press in 1967

The years have gone by but the minutes are still missing

The most controversial meeting in sporting history remains shrouded in secrecy

The Last Lingua Franca, By Nicholas Ostler

Goodbye English, say hello to Google and Babel Fish

Jane Fonda as Barbarella in 1968

How women are winning sci-fi's battle of the sexes

Say farewell to the Barbarella stereotype as rise in female authors drags genre into 21st century

The Cern results appear to overturn Einstein's theory of relativity

Einstein's laws questioned as speed of light is broken again

An experiment showing it is possible to travel faster than the speed of light, and so confound a fundamental principle of theoretical physics, has passed its first serious test of validity.

The original research carried out by Hauptman and his partner Jerome Karle was ignored for years

Professor Herbert Hauptman: Nobel Prize winner

Herbert Hauptman was the co-recipient of the 1985 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering work on determining molecular structures using X-ray crystallography. Withhis co-winner Jerome Karle, he developed a mathematical method that revolutionised chemistry and opened a new era in research in the determination of molecular structures of crystallised materials.

Minor British Institutions: Biscuit dunking

Dunking biscuits is one of the chief pleasures many Britons afford themselves, which tells you much about the country. Even so, the practice is disapproved of by other Britons, mostly members of the middle classes who follow what they believe, usually erroneously, to be the views of the upper classes.

Davies at work with a red pen

Any colour as long as it's red

He's one of the most respected – and recognisable – figures in architecture. But what inspired Mike Davies' curious obsession?

Andre Villas-Boas: The Chelsea manager says Torres is helping the club by creating goals

I'd pay £50m for Torres today, says Villas-Boas

Chelsea manager backs misfiring striker to hit the target against former club Liverpool

Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?