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Outlook First Standard Chartered, then Experian, and now Sainsbury’s. It’s shaping up to be a year of boardroom upheaval, and it’s still only January. Who next? Well, a little bird tells me Schroders’ veteran chief executive Michael Dobson has sounded out confidants in the City about the idea of him becoming chairman of this granddaddy of fund managers, succeeding 69-year-old Andrew Beeson.

Glaxo adds to gloom at RBS

Pharmaceuticals blue-chip GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has replaced Hoare Govett as one of its brokers, putting more pressure on the Royal Bank of Scotland's corporate broking arm.

Fog, Finborough Theatre, London

The soldier who returns to find that he's a stranger in the country he fought for is a familiar figure in drama (one thinks of Simon Stephens' recent Motortown), as is the absconding father who is finally forced to confront the consequences of his neglect.

Iraq: Briton's body 'to be released'

The Iraqi militia that kidnapped five Britons in 2007 has offered to hand over the body of the last missing man amid claims he was "killed in a clash".

Body of British hostage 'to be returned'

The body of a British hostage who was kidnapped in Iraq five years ago could be returned to the UK, according to reports.

Somali gunman kills aid worker

A disgruntled former employee shot at least two international workers from Médecins Sans Frontières at the charity's office in the Somali capital Mogadishu, the group said yesterday. At least one person was killed.

Ocado plumbs the depths after alert

Ocado's shares sank to an all-time low after the online grocer issued a profits warning yesterday, as it continues to struggle with "capacity constraints" at its warehouse in Hertfordshire.

Zynga's shares fall on its Nasdaq debut

Shares in Zynga, the online games company behind the Facebook favourite Farmville, fell 5 per cent on their first day of trading on Friday.

HMV to post loss ahead of make-or-break Christmas

HMV is expected to post another big loss in its interim results tomorrow, as analysts predict a "make or break Christmas" for the beleaguered music retailer.

Market Report: Ashtead benefits from $2bn merger of US rivals

Instead of being scared off by its rivals across the Atlantic ganging up, a multibillion-dollar merger between two of its peers gave Ashtead a boost yesterday. The equipment hire firm climbed 10.2p to 209.6p on the mid-tier index after United Rentals agreed to pay $2bn for RSC Holdings, sparking hopes it could become a takeover target itself.

The Week Ahead: Carpetright's suffering is likely to continue in 2012

It is fair to say that 2011 has been a year to forget for Carpetright. One of the retailers worst hit by the pressures on the high street, a string of profits warnings has seen the share price of Britain's biggest floor coverings retailer almost halve since January. Judging by comments in the City, it doesn't exactly look as if things are going to get much better when Carpetright announces its interim results tomorrow. Analysts at Singer Capital Markets expect it to "report its worst first-half figures as a listed company", forecasting a pre-tax profit for the period of £1.2m – almost a tenth of what it managed the previous year. The UK will be the culprit, they say, with a 3 per cent drop in like-for-like sales alongside a steep fall in margins after efforts to revive the business.

Mulberry bags boom in profits

Luxury handbag maker Mulberry shrugged off the economic gloom today as it trebled its half-year profits on the back of strong sales at home and abroad.

Olympus to reveal £1.1bn hidden losses

Japanese giant could be kicked off Tokyo Stock Exchange depending on scale of false accounting

The Week Ahead: TUI Travel cannot escape the turbulence altogether

While Thomas Cook has been engaged in a struggle for its future, fellow operator TUI Travel has been faring rather better. Its bitter rival may have lost roughly 60 per cent of its share price sinceadmitting last month it needed more cash to survive, but over the same period TUI has managed to advance 10 per cent.

FSA will not intervene for pensioners

The Financial Services Authority's chief executive Hector Sants has dashed hopes that the watchdog will intervene in a fierce dispute between British pensioners and the Irish government.

Stephen Lawrence court staff sanctioned to work by union

Court staff working on the case of two men accused of murdering Stephen Lawrence were encouraged to work by pickets in the only case of sanctioned strike-breaking at a British trial, said union officials.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor