News

The actress, a self-proclaimed Homeland uber-fan, was overjoyed to meet star of the agent drama Damian Lewis. The spoiler? Not so much

The Nick Townsend column: Sorry Cristiano, modern 'slavery' is Olympic rowing

Gold medallist Williams explains how one coach would give Sir Alex a run for his money when the prize is pride

Book Of A Lifetime: Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys

Wide Sargasso Sea is not just a great novel, it is many brilliant books in one. Multi-layered and complex, Jean Rhys's prelude to Jane Eyre vividly illustrates how accounts and understanding differ, and creates a sense of the characters' past being inescapable.

Uefa counter Blatter slave claim

UEFA have warned that players are becoming ever more powerful as a consequence of the Bosman ruling - and played down Sepp Blatter's suggestions they are slaves to clubs.

Blatter wades into Ronaldo row

FIFA president Sepp Blatter believes Cristiano Ronaldo should be allowed to leave Manchester United for Real Madrid if he so desires, criticising a trend towards "modern slavery" in football.

Torn, Arcola, London

Femi Oguns' debut play, in which he also stars, is a contemporary Romeo and Juliet-type drama of young love fighting to survive in a world of corrosive enmities.

Johann Hari: No wonder 'Gone With The Wind' has failed

Lordly lordy lord Miss Scarlett, this musical be one biiiiiig turkey! The Gone With The Wind musical in London – a thrilling experiment in singalong slavery and whoopin' white supremacy – is closing after six weeks. I sensed something was wrong when I settled into my seat and realised I was opposite a large sign saying "Negroes For Sale", with a group of black audience members sitting uncomfortably below. We watched – open-mouthed and gaping – for three-and-a-half hours as the Confederacy tap-danced and jazz-handed its way to defeat.

Activists out Burger King dirty tricks operation

Activists have outed a corporate dirty tricks operation tied to Burger King aimed at discrediting efforts to improve the often horrific conditions of migrant workers in Florida's tomato fields.

Lester Holloway: 'Victim stories have had their day in black papers'

The new editor of 'New Nation' newspaper, says it's time for the ethnic press to move on from a 'oppressed' mindset, but insists slavery is still a hot topic.

Album: Jazz Warriors, Afropeans (Destin-E)

You probably had to be there to feel the full effect, but Courtney Pine's reconvening of jazz big band the Warriors for last October's Barbican Abolition concert offers plenty of incidental delights.

Paperback: Decency and Disorder, by Ben Wilson

Devoted (if you credit the media) to booze, lechery and brawls, Britain seems to have reverted to its 18th-century manners. This outstanding history explains how the country first went "respectable". Spanning the age from the French Revolution to the arrival of Victoria, 1789 to 1837, Wilson shows how radicals and libertines looked on aghast as the evangelical middle-class hastened the spread of "cant" in a land of four-lettered freedom. It's a history of self-image as much as events: maybe Georgians were not so wild, proto-Victorians not so prim, as they thought. But even the high ideals of the prigs – such as anti-slavery – suffered from a taint of hypocrisy.

Lincoln letter expressing hope of an end to slavery sells for $3.4m

Abraham Lincoln's heartfelt letter to youngsters who asked him to free America's "little slave children" has been sold at auction for $3.4m (£1.7m).

Paperback: If a Pirate I Must Be, by Richard Sanders

Born in Pembroke around 1682, Bartolomew Roberts was a man of "energy, drive andability", who became the "greatest of allpirates" in every respect but one. Soon after his death, his "throat ripped out by grapeshot" during an encounter with the Royal Navy off West Africa in 1722, he was pretty much forgotten, though Long John Silver gives him a name-check in Treasure Island. Disinterred in Sanders's lively yarn, Roberts emerges as a pirate too late for the age of piracy, like the ageing gunslingers in The Wild Bunch. Ironically, the defeat of Roberts and his like "created a world safe for slavery".

Paperback: The Trader, the Owner, the Slave, by James Walvin

Through three individuals, Walvin explores the rise and fall of the British slave trade. John Newton, who was a slave trader from 1748 to 1752, wrote "Amazing Grace" in 1772, but it was another decade before he could admit his misdeeds. Thomas Thistlewood was a slave owner responsible for terrible cruelty and depravity, though he was a "bookish man" and a dedicated gardener. The slave is Olaudah Equiano, another bookish man who was kidnapped in England and enslaved in Montserrat. In this disturbing but gripping book, Walvin explains the British volte-face on slavery.

Negro With a Hat: The rise and fall of Marcus Garvey, By Colin Grant

The orator and visionary may not have made it back to Africa but his dream inspired Bob Marley

Nadal too strong for nemesis Hewitt

Another day on red clay, another figure in the black for Rafael Nadal. The statistics will show that Lleyton Hewitt yesterday became the Spaniard's 57th successive victim on terre battue, but any impression that the French Open's defending champion is having an easy ride here would be thoroughly misleading.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen