Arts and Entertainment Nathan Filer, winner of the 2013 Costa Book of the Year

33-year-old upsets the odds with his novel 'The Shock of the Fall' - the story of a teenager's descent into mental illness

Angela Gheorghiu/Marius Manea/Philharmonia Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall

For anyone wondering what on earth the Overture to Leonard Bernstein's Candide was doing at the start of this bizarre, rag-bag of an evening (there seemed to be no rhyme or reason for its presence) might I suggest that the inference may have been that "in the best of all possible worlds" (to quote Voltaire) Angela Gheorghiu would have been singing more than two (yes, two) arias in the official programme with two more tired old chestnuts added as encores.

Party Of The Week: Man, what a great evening...

The great and the good of the literary world congregated in the old library at London's Guildhall for a party – before the announcement of this year's Man Booker prize later that night.

London Sinfonietta, Kings Place / Division Lobby, South Bank Centre

The Kings Place electro-acoustic weekend opened with a potential killer-question from its presenter Robert Worby: was it not high time we stopped talking about ‘electro-acoustic’ music altogether?

Party Of The Week: A good Eye for a party

Arriving in torrential rain, the Doo-Wop pop star VV Brown sported a spectacular Busby for the Love London party at County Hall, where she performed live on Tuesday night. Held on the South Bank in the shadow of the London Eye, which hosted the event, the party celebrated the launch of its 4D Experience, at its bespoke in-house cinema.

A gentile voice that's set to trigger some heated debate

Martin Bright is the first non-Jew to be political editor of the Jewish Chronicle. He talks to Ian Burrell

Win a 'dinner in the sky'

If the idea of sipping wine while dining 200ft up in the air appeals, then read on.

Dinner in the Sky may sound outlandish but it's gathered quite a following and, in a collaboration with California-based wine producers Ravenswood, it's in the UK on Saturday dangling from a crane above London's South Bank.

How We Met: Gillian Greenwood & Melvyn Bragg

'He's got this buccaneer spirit that the general public don't ever get to see'

Chris Schuler: Tales on the riverbank

All this week and next, the London Literature Festival is taking place on the South Bank. Whereas festivals held in smaller places such as Hay or Cheltenham generate a sense of excitement because they take over the whole town, London’s festival tends to get a bit lost amid the cultural cornucopia of the capital. Which is a shame because, as literary festivals go, it’s up there with the best of them.

Phedre, National Theatre, London

Since she last appeared at the National six years ago, Helen Mirren has become a dame and played the Queen. So she's no stranger to the purple in Jean Racine's great classical 17th-century tragedy about a dysfunctional royal expiring with incestuous love for her stepson.

DJ Taylor: Middle-class mania

The bruising legacy of the 1970s; Dan Brown gets the Potter treatment; why we watch SpongeBob SquarePants; and how a king's death imperilled Cromer FC

Terence Blacker: TV shouldn't exist to treat us like idiots

So it was true, what the champions of multi-channel television told us. One day, they said, the variety of programmes on offer will herald a bright new dawn of choice. It will be incomparably easier for viewers to plan their evenings. How right they were. Viewing selection is certainly a straightforward matter these days. One looks at the list of programmes on offer, and quickly reaches the conclusion that there are better things to do than sit in front of a screen, having one's intelligence insulted.

Boyd Tonkin: A Polish path from past to future

The Week In Books

JS Bach: The Miracle at Coethen, South Bank Centre, London

One advantage the Barbican and South Bank Centre have over other venues is flexibility, and their 'total-immersion' seasons represent the best possible use of that freedom.

'South Bank' under threat as ITV's revenue streams run dry

Broadcaster's flagship arts programme could lose out to 'The X Factor'. Matthew Bell reports
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Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
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Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
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Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border