Arts and Entertainment Nathan Filer, winner of the 2013 Costa Book of the Year

33-year-old upsets the odds with his novel 'The Shock of the Fall' - the story of a teenager's descent into mental illness

David Lister: No rhyme or reason to booking fees

Few arts issues attract more discontent from audiences than booking fees. There is widespread and justifiable anger at West End theatres and rock concert venues adding a charge to the ticket price for reasons too linguistically obscure – handling charge, transaction fee – to understand.

Aimard/Boulez, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Reviewed by Michael Church

Law Lords block police bid to stop critical mass cyclists

Police attempts to outlaw the monthly Critical Mass cycle ride through the streets of London unless its route was notified in advance were blocked by the Law Lords today.

Boris Giltburg, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

We'll be hearing a lot more of Boris Giltburg.

Ten ways to enjoy London on a budget

Hannah Bills offers a wealth of ideas for free attractions in and around the capital

American embassy plans move to south London

The American embassy is to be moved out of central London to the South Bank of the Thames, ending a 200-year association with Grosvenor Square. Robert Tuttle, the American ambassador to the UK, announced yesterday that he had signed a conditional agreement with a developer to acquire a five-acre "opportunity area" in Nine Elms. He said the relocation would see "America playing a role in the regeneration of the South Bank".

Portico Quartet, Rough Trade East, London

Get yourself down to the National Theatre without delay. There's a good chance that you might catch Portico Quartet busking outside it. To see this genre-defying south London four-piece is to witness four young, very talented instrumentalists crafting sounds like you've never heard. Besides, how many Mercury Prize nominees do you know who still work the streets?

Dyke to chair British Film Institute

The former BBC director general Greg Dyke has been chosen to succeed Anthony Minghella as the chairman of the British Film Institute.

Philharmonia/ Salonen & Aimard, Royal Festival Hall, London

Thirty minutes before the start of this concert, the Philharmonia's incoming principal conductor and artistic adviser Esa-Pekka Salonen was to be observed hovering at the back of the crowd in the Royal Festival Hall ballroom, listening to the hypnotic chimings of the Southbank gamelan.

101 Star Bars: Benugo, London

Following its relaunch in March, the BFI (formerly the NFT, formerly still a grey old restaurant that you’d scoot past on the way to aThames view) has taken on a completely new character.

Ensemble Intercontemporain / Malkki, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

For some composers, a centenary is too soon to find a rounded perspective on their work. The music may still be widely influential, or it may have gone temporarily out of fashion. It's different with Olivier Messiaen, even though his music has never stopped being with us since he died in 1992, because he wrote half a dozen huge works at various stages of his life that have always had the effect of summing up what he was about. So there is a confidence about the South Bank Centre's year-long festival, which properly began with a blockbuster, Des canyons aux étoiles, written when the composer was in his sixties.

Melvyn Bragg: And the award for longevity goes to...

For 30 years Melvyn Bragg has prided himself on the egalitarianism of 'The South Bank Show'. In ITV's current chilly commercial climate he's had to pare back his team – but he'll never stop being a guardian of the arts. He tells Ciar Byrne why

Laughing in a Foreign Language, Hayward Gallery, London

When you're outside it, the joke is no laughing matter: Humour is lost in translation at this show: for gags, stick to 'The Simpsons'

You write the reviews: Portico Quartet, SOAS Brunei Gallery, London

"We all live together, you see, and tonight this is for Jack," says Nick Mulvey, pointing at the saxophonist, who sports the looks of Jude Law and a chunky Norwegian jersey. "He sleepwalks and fell down the stairs last night." It's a genial way for the hang-player to introduce "Steps in the Wrong Direction", a track from this new band's first CD, Knee-Deep in the North Sea.

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