Voices

With poachers now killing almost 11,000 a year for their ivory, urgent steps need to be be taken to stop the cull

Michael McCarthy: This is no forecast. Climate change is here and now

You can look at the warming of Lake Tanganyika as a geographical and scientific curiosity; but you're probably wiser to look at it with a considerable sense of foreboding.

Press handouts can save the lives of children

Western subsidies help Tanzanian reporters expose health risks to babies and fight against Aids, says Kevin Rafter

Pulis: I'll miss Cup final if we get there

Tony Pulis has a mountain to climb – and for once the phrase does not refer to the Stoke City manager's prospects of winning at Chelsea in today's FA Cup quarter-final, or his chances of convincing a London crowd his side are more than simply muscular hackers.

Britons held hostage by Somali pirates speak of torment

A British couple held hostage by Somali pirates spoke last night of the mutual torment of their separation as their wedding anniversary approaches.

Campaigners challenge BAE plea bargain decision

Serious Fraud Office director Richard Alderman faced a High Court challenge today over his decision to agree a plea bargain with BAE Systems.

US contract loss torpedoes BAE profits

Defence giant BAE Systems today said profits had been torpedoed by the loss of a key US contract and hefty fines to settle bribery allegations.

Zanzibar: Trouble on Paradise Island

Robbery and power cuts – two of the problems awaiting visitors to the isle of Zanzibar

BAE Systems pays $400m to settle bribery charges

Shares rise after BAE says settlement 'draws a solid line' under past legal issues

BAE Systems pays £286m over corruption charges

Defence giant BAE Systems said today it had agreed to pay fines totalling £286 million to settle corruption charges with the Serious Fraud Office and US Department of Justice.

Britain to oppose sale of stockpiled ivory

Third 'one-off' auction will revive illegal poaching trade, say conservationists

Album: Bela Fleck, Throw Down Your Heart (Rounder)

The African musical safari has become a prized milestone in the career of many a serious-minded Western musician, a tradition firmly established by Paul Simon's Graceland and arguably peaking with Henry Kaiser and David Lindley's 1992 exploration of Malagasy music, A World Out of Time.

Daniel Howden: A golden example for Africa's resources

Lake Victoria Notebook: Mwanza is one of those places that doesn't get written about

Marc Sommers: Only urban areas offer young the hope of paid work

Governments and international institutions have been slow to recognise, accept and address the shift of refugees to cities. UNHCR's report on this issue is to be commended, as it calls attention to an urgent concern with global implications. It is also a significant and positive step away from the agency's previous grudging acceptance of urban refugee realities.

A Matter of Time, By Alex Capus

A war-torn farce worth waiting for
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine