Family focus: Mark Zuckerberg

The rules on Facebook etiquette for parents, children and siblings

How do you keep familial relations sweet on social media?

The dogs of Littlefield, By Suzanne Berne - Review

The Orange Prize winner Suzanne Berne is on familiar ground with her fifth novel examining life in an affluent American village. Littlefield, Massachusetts, is named one of the 10 best places to live in America. Curiously, it also houses an unusually high number of psychotherapists. Clarice Watkins, a sociologist from the University of Chicago, decides to study Littlefield to find out exactly what makes it such a good place to live. She arrives to find a town at war, split between those who want their dogs to be off the leash in the local park and those who object. Opinions become more polarised when someone starts poisoning dogs and an undercurrent of fear pulses through the community.

Nick D’Aloisio sold his mobile phone app, called Summly, to Yahoo for £20m

In the Red review of the year: A teenage entrepreneur striking £20m deal with Yahoo was a highlight

Couldn’t you just pretend you’re going to buy a white boat (named Dirty Girl)?

A Facebook logo made up from pictures of users. Many teens are turning their back on the social network

Facebook 'dead and buried' as teens switch to Snapchat and Whatsapp

Teens are embarrassed to even be associated with the social network as more and more parents attempt to 'friend' their children

Totally off the wall: Helen Monks and Alex Davies in 'Raised by Wolves'

Raised by Wolves: TV review - Working-class heroes from Wolves are a howling success

Well, this was brilliant. Raised by Wolves was a half-hour sitcom pilot written by Caitlin Moran and her sister Caroline Moran. It was set in the modern day, but based on their own childhood growing up as two of eight, home-schooled, in a three-bed council house in Wolverhampton.

Three men killed in fireball crash with lorry as high-speed ‘race’ ends in tragedy

Two men also involved in the crash have been arrested

A National Guardsman at an observation post in Nogales, Arizona. Last year, a 16-year-old was shot 10 times here by Border Patrol agents

Death on the US-Mexican border: the killings America chooses to ignore

Since 2005, patrol agents and CBP officers have killed some 42 people along the US-Mexican border without facing any public consequences – or any large-scale media coverage

Michael and Martin Gray have had their picture taken together with Father Christmas annually for 30 years

Two brothers get photo taken with Santa every Christmas for 30 years

Michael and Martin have had their picture taken with Father Christmas every year since 1980, now they are getting their children in on the act

The Hart district of Hampshire has been named the most desirable place to live in the UK. With 84 square miles of green wooded landscape and Hampshire's largest freshwater lake, the area has been dubbed

Hart can't possibly be the best place to live in Britain – there's not even a decent restaurant

Hampshire exile Jamie Merrill fails to see what’s so great about this particular slice of pricey commuter belt

Two Colorado teenagers arrested over alleged shooting plot at Trinidad High School

Boys may have been planning the attack for up to six weeks

A major review of the industry launched after the Rochdale child-grooming scandal has revealed that 63 privately owned children’s care homes across the country did not meet the Government’s minimum standards (picture posed by model)

Rochdale sex abuse cases could have been prevented 'if teams had acted earlier on danger signs'

The latest in a series of damning reports concludes that early intervention would have saved the teenage girls from repeated attacks

Book review: Stephen Ward Was Innocent, OK: The Case for Overturning his Conviction, By Geoffrey Robertson QC

On 30 July 1963, Stephen Ward, former osteopath to the rich and powerful, heard the judge’s summing up at the conclusion of his Old Bailey trial and felt do desolate that he retreated to a friend’s flat, wrote a suicide note and swallowed barbiturates.

Stephen Ward Was Innocent, OK: The Case for Overturning his Conviction,
By Geoffrey Robertson QC - book review: Forensic exposé brings another scandal to light

On 30 July 1963, Stephen Ward, former osteopath to the rich and powerful, heard the judge’s summing up at the conclusion of his Old Bailey trial and felt do desolate that he retreated to a friend’s flat, wrote a suicide note and swallowed barbiturates.

Dashed hopes: Justin Bieber was 'just messing around' and will not be retiring

Justin Bieber isn't retiring from music after all

All celebrations must now end as the 'Boyfriend' singer is here to stay

Roy Hodgson is hoping the extra day in Manaus will aid the players' acclimatisation

World Cup 2014: England opt for extra time in hot and humid Manaus

Roy Hodgson wants his side to acclimatise to the Amazonian conditions

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent