News Dr Leah Totton, right, alongside Apprentice mentor Karren Brady

The first cosmetic skin clinic launched by last year’s winner of The Apprentice, in partnership with Lord Sugar, has opened its doors

The Rest on the Flight: Selected Poems, By Peter Porter

The late Peter Porter, as selector Sean O'Brien puts in his preface to this generous choice from 19 volumes and half-a-century of wonderfully singular poetry, broke all the rules that Kingsley Amis once set about forbidden topics for verse. Shamelessly, he wrote not just about "other poems and paintings and foreign cities and museums", but operas and sonatas, philosophers and cathedrals, generals and gods; even, in "The Apprentice's Sorceror", of the CERN particle accelerator primed in its "Swiss Hole" to recreate "how the universe began". With shocking Australian cheek, he sauntered into every minefield for a timidly populist age and came back with treasure to be enjoyed by any reader with a nose for new discoveries, an eye for bold connections and an ear for the ever-flexible music of his verse. Yet it's typical that his landmark poem about a cultural icon should address itself not to a painter or thinker but a stuffed animal: the racehorse Phar Lap in the Melbourne Museum, the beastly idol who followed a Classical recipe for greatness: "To live in strength, to excel and die too soon".

The soft sell: Is Beverage No 7 a drink worth staying sober for?

Fed up with binge-drinking Britain and realising that he was sinking into alcoholism, Peter Spanton set about creating the sort of soft drink he craved. The result: a sophisticated potion he calls Beverage No 7

BBC 1 will go HD by end of year

Programmes such as EastEnders, The Apprentice and The One Show are to be broadcast in high definition by the end of the year as the whole of BBC 1 goes HD, it was announced yesterday.

Last Night's TV: Junior Apprentice, BBC1<br />Cracking Antiques, BBC2

It's The Apprentice, but not quite as we know it. For one thing, Surallen has gone – that terrified smear of an honorific rendered obsolete by last year's ennoblement. It's Lord Sugar now, which doesn't have the same ring to it at all, though it did provide for one unintentional moment of comedy in last night's opener, when a prospective firee fell over himself trying to make the depths of his humility clear: "No no... definitely not Sir... Lord," he stammered, making Sugar sound like a wrathful Jahweh, putting in an appearance to smite the unprofitable. For another thing, all the contestants in Junior Apprentice are teenagers, which leaves the avid viewer in something of a conscience trap when it comes to gleeful loathing. Half the pleasure of The Apprentice has always been comeuppance – the certifiable ego-pump of the opening few minutes stirring in us a desire for public humiliation. Do we want to see teenagers cry, though? And even if we do (don't judge me till you've seen them in action), won't our self-indulgence leave a slightly sour taste behind it?

Lib Dems get sprinkling of celebrity glitz

The Liberal Democrats were given a sprinkling of election magic on Monday after the party said Harry Potter actor Daniel Radcliffe had given his support days before Britain goes to the polls.

ITV poaches Chiles from BBC in &#163;6m deal

Adrian Chiles has left the BBC for ITV in a four-year deal worth £6m that will see him become head of the commercial broadcaster's football coverage and the face of the relaunched version of its breakfast television arm GMTV.

Sugar's &#163;400,000 sweetener for Labour

Enterprise tsar Lord Sugar has

Alan Sugar gives &pound;400,000 to Labour campaign

Enterprise tsar Lord Sugar has donated £400,000 to the Labour Party, he announced today.

What every expert needs, a book midwife

Mindy Gibbins-Klein talks to Margareta Pagano about the middle route between vanity and traditional publishing

Market too tough for a Big Bear listing

Big Bear Group has shelved it's plans to float on the stock market. The company behind the Sugar Puffs cereal brand, Fox's Glacier Mints and Just Brazils chocolates has become the latest in a wave of companies forced to ditch their hopes for listings.

Karren Brady vows to sort out West Ham's finances

Football's first lady, Karren Brady, has only been at West Ham for a few weeks but already she's confident the club can be made profitable over the next 12-18 months.

Why the real Alan Sugar hates to fire his employees

The enterprise tsar reveals his soft side to Michael Savage

Free online TV unites broadcasters

A new television streaming service launches online today, bringing together shows from the BBC, Channel 4 and Five on a single site.

Business Diary: Walsh asks staff to sign up for battle

British Airways boss Willie Walsh pulls no punches in a column in the company's staff magazine, accusing the Unite union of trying to "destroy us" with industrial action. Walsh has also had a large whiteboard "graffiti wall" installed at BA's Waterside headquarters where staff can leave messages of support for the campaign against the strikers.

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