Arts and Entertainment

The very ethos of his practice is rooted in a 1960s American obsession with the implications of space travel and, with that, an embedded fear of otherness,” writes the Guggenheim’s Nancy Spector in her introduction to this 30-year retrospective of Crewdson’s work.

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (PG)

Prince Caspian begins with a long, piercing scream, which seemed to continue in my head for the rest of its exorbitant two-and-a-half-hour running time.

Hollywood is finally chasing Amy

It's taken years, but Hollywood has finally invited the Oscar-nominated actress Amy Ryan to join the top flight.

Nova Scotia, Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

With the emergence of Nova Scotia, John Byrne's cult Slab Boys trilogy, begun 30 years ago, officially becomes a quartet. Of the boys introduced as colour-mixers in the slab room of a Paisley carpet factory, the central two are now in their sixties, struggling to hold on to their credibility and catch the buzzwords in a new Scotland. Phil McCann (played by Paul Morrow) makes Victor Meldrew seem almost reasonable, while, with his bad leg, Spanky Farrell (Gerry Mulgrew) brings new meaning to an old hippie. There is much humour in Byrne's keenly observed satire, but below the surface there's a minefield of human fears and fragilities, and a dangerously dark narrative thread catching out the audience mid-chortle.

Cornelia Parker: The artist's home is an industrial revelation

It was a run-down building, on a street where cars are still torched. But the artist Cornelia Parker spotted an opportunity to create a fabulous home

Leading article: Continental shift

A long time ago, the Chariots Of Fire screenwriter Colin Welland warned Hollywood that "the British are coming". But, quite unfairly, no one gave Tinseltown a heads up about the imminent European invasion. By the time the Los Angeles-based film community knew it was under attack at the Oscars two nights ago, it was too late. The French actress Marion Cotillard had captured the best actress award for portraying Edith Piaf in La Vie En Rose. Javier Bardem, from Spain, had taken the best supporting actor trophy for his psychopathic performance in No Country For Old Men.

<a target="_blank" href="http://blogs.independent.co.uk/independent/academy_awards_live/index.html">The Oscars as they happened: Scene by scene analysis</a>

A stunned Tilda Swinton wins best supporting actress, for her role as an over-achieving corporate lawyer in Michael Clayton. No-one looked more surprised than Swinton, who blanched visibly as her name was read out (instead of Cate Blanchett, the favourite), then mouthed "wow!" more than once as she popped out of her seat.



Cultural Life: Tim Lott, writer

For love of Derek: Remembering Jarman

Derek Jarman was an inspiration to Tilda Swinton and Isaac Julien. Together they've made a film explaining why. Karen Wright salutes a bittersweet remembrance

Michael Clayton (DVD)

Tony Gilroy's engrossing, intelligent, Oscar-nominated conspiracy thriller stars George Clooney as a fixer for a megabucks Manhattan law firm. He's the "janitor" who cleans up all of its clients' most incriminating messes, so when the firm's top litigator, Tom Wilkinson, strips off his clothes in a deposition room and announces that he's the "god of death", it's up to Clooney to reel him in before he compromises the shady class-action suit he's been working on. But Clooney suspects that Wilkinson might be the one who's sane, while his mercenary colleagues are the real gods of death.

A night of French triumph at the Baftas

Atonement's 14 Bafta nominations may have led to feverish predictions of a golden moment for British film but yesterday's awards ceremony turned out to be a triumph for French cinema as a biopic about the tumultuous life of the singer Edith Piaf became the biggest winner. La Vie En Rose scooped four Bafta awards at a ceremony at Covent Garden's Royal Opera House, despite the winning odds for Joe Wright's film adaptation of Ian McEwan's novel Atonement starring Keira Knightley, who walked away empty-handed.

Talent issue - the film director: Joanna Hogg

Joanna Hogg had such a remarkable beginning to her career it makes you wonder where she's been all these years. After the world premiere of her debut feature film Unrelated at the London Film Festival in October, for which she won the prestigious Fipresci prize, heads were being scratched. Who was this woman? Where did she come from? Unrelated seemed to incorporate elements of European and even Japanese film-making (Ozu and Eric Rohmer tend to get referenced here) and yet seemed more thoroughly British than any number of Hollywood-influenced capers that tend to get released these days. The story of a woman who goes on holiday to Italy with family friends, and then experiences a kind of meltdown, Unrelated has a freshness and a fluency not seen in a British film since Derek Jarman died.

Young Adam

Deserved acclaim for a bleak tale of desire

Film: It should never have been made

The War Zone Director: Tim Roth Starring: Ray Winstone, Lara Belmont, Freddie Cunliffe (98 mins; 18)

C4 refuses to cut movie's incest scenes

CHANNEL 4 executives are backing a controversial film that features explicit scenes of incest, saying they would rather not release it than have a single frame cut.
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
tv
Sport
footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
Voices
Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Arts and Entertainment
Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
tvName confirmed for third series
Sport
Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
art
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine