Arts and Entertainment

The very ethos of his practice is rooted in a 1960s American obsession with the implications of space travel and, with that, an embedded fear of otherness,” writes the Guggenheim’s Nancy Spector in her introduction to this 30-year retrospective of Crewdson’s work.

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (PG)

Prince Caspian begins with a long, piercing scream, which seemed to continue in my head for the rest of its exorbitant two-and-a-half-hour running time.

Hollywood is finally chasing Amy

It's taken years, but Hollywood has finally invited the Oscar-nominated actress Amy Ryan to join the top flight.

Nova Scotia, Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

With the emergence of Nova Scotia, John Byrne's cult Slab Boys trilogy, begun 30 years ago, officially becomes a quartet. Of the boys introduced as colour-mixers in the slab room of a Paisley carpet factory, the central two are now in their sixties, struggling to hold on to their credibility and catch the buzzwords in a new Scotland. Phil McCann (played by Paul Morrow) makes Victor Meldrew seem almost reasonable, while, with his bad leg, Spanky Farrell (Gerry Mulgrew) brings new meaning to an old hippie. There is much humour in Byrne's keenly observed satire, but below the surface there's a minefield of human fears and fragilities, and a dangerously dark narrative thread catching out the audience mid-chortle.

Cornelia Parker: The artist's home is an industrial revelation

It was a run-down building, on a street where cars are still torched. But the artist Cornelia Parker spotted an opportunity to create a fabulous home

Leading article: Continental shift

A long time ago, the Chariots Of Fire screenwriter Colin Welland warned Hollywood that "the British are coming". But, quite unfairly, no one gave Tinseltown a heads up about the imminent European invasion. By the time the Los Angeles-based film community knew it was under attack at the Oscars two nights ago, it was too late. The French actress Marion Cotillard had captured the best actress award for portraying Edith Piaf in La Vie En Rose. Javier Bardem, from Spain, had taken the best supporting actor trophy for his psychopathic performance in No Country For Old Men.

<a target="_blank" href="http://blogs.independent.co.uk/independent/academy_awards_live/index.html">The Oscars as they happened: Scene by scene analysis</a>

A stunned Tilda Swinton wins best supporting actress, for her role as an over-achieving corporate lawyer in Michael Clayton. No-one looked more surprised than Swinton, who blanched visibly as her name was read out (instead of Cate Blanchett, the favourite), then mouthed "wow!" more than once as she popped out of her seat.



Cultural Life: Tim Lott, writer

For love of Derek: Remembering Jarman

Derek Jarman was an inspiration to Tilda Swinton and Isaac Julien. Together they've made a film explaining why. Karen Wright salutes a bittersweet remembrance

Michael Clayton (DVD)

Tony Gilroy's engrossing, intelligent, Oscar-nominated conspiracy thriller stars George Clooney as a fixer for a megabucks Manhattan law firm. He's the "janitor" who cleans up all of its clients' most incriminating messes, so when the firm's top litigator, Tom Wilkinson, strips off his clothes in a deposition room and announces that he's the "god of death", it's up to Clooney to reel him in before he compromises the shady class-action suit he's been working on. But Clooney suspects that Wilkinson might be the one who's sane, while his mercenary colleagues are the real gods of death.

A night of French triumph at the Baftas

Atonement's 14 Bafta nominations may have led to feverish predictions of a golden moment for British film but yesterday's awards ceremony turned out to be a triumph for French cinema as a biopic about the tumultuous life of the singer Edith Piaf became the biggest winner. La Vie En Rose scooped four Bafta awards at a ceremony at Covent Garden's Royal Opera House, despite the winning odds for Joe Wright's film adaptation of Ian McEwan's novel Atonement starring Keira Knightley, who walked away empty-handed.

Talent issue - the film director: Joanna Hogg

Joanna Hogg had such a remarkable beginning to her career it makes you wonder where she's been all these years. After the world premiere of her debut feature film Unrelated at the London Film Festival in October, for which she won the prestigious Fipresci prize, heads were being scratched. Who was this woman? Where did she come from? Unrelated seemed to incorporate elements of European and even Japanese film-making (Ozu and Eric Rohmer tend to get referenced here) and yet seemed more thoroughly British than any number of Hollywood-influenced capers that tend to get released these days. The story of a woman who goes on holiday to Italy with family friends, and then experiences a kind of meltdown, Unrelated has a freshness and a fluency not seen in a British film since Derek Jarman died.

Young Adam

Deserved acclaim for a bleak tale of desire

Film: It should never have been made

The War Zone Director: Tim Roth Starring: Ray Winstone, Lara Belmont, Freddie Cunliffe (98 mins; 18)

C4 refuses to cut movie's incest scenes

CHANNEL 4 executives are backing a controversial film that features explicit scenes of incest, saying they would rather not release it than have a single frame cut.
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