Arts and Entertainment

The very ethos of his practice is rooted in a 1960s American obsession with the implications of space travel and, with that, an embedded fear of otherness,” writes the Guggenheim’s Nancy Spector in her introduction to this 30-year retrospective of Crewdson’s work.

High art adorns commuters' path paths

"Sitter required". As job descriptions go, it sounded like a pretty cushy number. A follow-up enquiry revealed that indeed the applicant would be required to sit in an armchair for a living, from 9am-5pm Monday to Friday, plus eight hours overtime. Nice work if you can get it - or so Myles Stawman thought.

THE BIG SLEEP Since Monday the actress Tilda Swinton has been lying, apparently asleep, in a glass case for eight hours a day, the centrepiece of an exhibition that features the possessions (and one brain) of famous dead people. 'The Maybe' at the Serpentine Gallery is the first hit of the new season: 20,000 people will have seen it by the time it closes on Sunday. And for once, punters and critics seem to be in general agreement...

Usually, I work at the Hayward or the Royal Academy, so when they told me I was coming here to supervise this show I thought, 'God, this is going to be boring.' But it's tremendous. I really feel part of it now. In fact, Tilda's even asked me to stay here all week, though I would normally be on a new job by now.

Visual Arts TILDA SWINTON Serpentine Gallery, London

"Please come and go quietly," reads the sign on the wall of the Serpentine Gallery and, for once, visitors seem to be taking notice. Their light tread, though, is not in deference to authority, but out of respect for the person whose slight form exerts such an extraordinary power over this room and forms the centrepiece of "The Maybe", one of this year's most inspired shows.

Art lovers enchanted by tank girl's sleeping beauty entrances art lovers

Marianne Macdonald gauges reaction to an artistic lie-in by Tilda Swinton by the actress Tilda Swinton at a London gallery

Dear Tilda Swinton

To the actress - sorry, performance artist - contemplating lying in a glass coffin all day: don't, it'll be deadly dull for you and plain deadly for the rest of us

The Penguin/Independent summer books quiz

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Photo finish

Photo finish

REVIEW : No scoop for a newsman as happy as Harry

Harry (BBC1), as has been fairly widely reported, has had a face- lift. The first series of the Michael Elphick vehicle was apparently deemed rather dour and down in the mouth by the viewers and, after focus-groups to identify the problems and a few weeks to let the scars heal, it has returned with a strangely taut smile. The result, an unprecedented outbreak of journalistic ethics centring on the Darlington area, is decidedly odd.

Visions of a world shrouded in techno-tosh

For some time I took the view that I wasn't paid enough to watch ITV's Peak Practice (I charge extra if there's any danger of lapsing into unconsciousness). But such astonishing numbers of people watch it for nothing that I thought I had better b race myself for the new series. Fifteen million people can certainly be wrong, but you can't help wondering why the crowd has gathered. I can't honestly say that I'm any the wiser after watching it, but I suspect that the tranquillised stupor that settle s on one after a while (and which makes intelligent analysis difficult) may be at the heart of the matter. It wasn't a stimulating experience and that's the point. Perhaps someone could wire some viewers up to an ECG and see what happens to their alpha w aves.

Review: Invisible earnings and visible yearnings

WHEN SHE means business Mary Goldring talks in very short sentences. Urgent sentences. Purposeful. Incisive. Then occasionally, as if this is all getting a bit terse for her, there is a sudden blossom of purple prose. In her report on the BBC for The Mary Goldring Audit last night she was on fine form. 'Cat-cautious behind the scenes - the alleyways of a temporary town,' she word-daubed, as the camera watched her tip-toeing through the Outside Broadcast cables at Wimbledon.

VIDEO / Video Rental

INDECENT PROPOSAL (Paramount 15 112mins) Robert Redford offers Demi Moore pounds 1m for a night of passion. This isn't a plot, it's an idea for a plot - and a bad one too; Modern Love, Californian Style. Woody Harrelson amuses as the architect husband with a thing about bricks.

INTERVIEW / Beneath the hump and the imp: The triumphant Richard III, the very biological Ariel: an angry intelligence lies behind Simon Russell Beale's spitting portrayals

THE PHOTOGRAPH says it all. Simon Russell Beale is not ugly. For some reason, his reputation as an actor has been overshadowed by this myth about his ugliness - a myth he himself has encouraged, remarking to journalists: 'I hate my body. I hate my looks. I hate my voice.' Self-hatred was his spur.

THEATRE: Taking their act on the road: Middle-scale touring companies are all dressed up and hoping to go places. Georgina Brown reports

STEPHEN UNWIN caught a snatch of conversation the other day which ran like this: 'But will his Shakespeare have women in their underpants?' The reference was to his shocking and remarkable production of Manfred Karge's Man to Man in which Tilda Swinton wore Y-fronts stuffed with socks. If the questioner risks Unwin's A Midsummer Night's Dream, he will in fact find codpiece Shakespeare. Another shock of sorts.

FILM / Under a sun that never sets: Indochine (12); Wittgenstein (12); Distinguished Gentleman (15); Forever Young (PG)

SUFFERING has never seemed so soigne as in Indochine. Regis Wargnier's epic smothers the final throes of French rule in 1930s Indo-China in chic. The clamour of the insurgent nation is all but drowned by the sobs and sighs of the Mills & Boon story that is the film's focus - a remix of Madame Butterfly which makes Puccini seem a model of plausibility. The Cio-Cio-San figure is an orphaned Vietnamese princess, Camille (Linh Dan Pham), who falls in love with Jean-Baptiste (Vincent Perez), a French naval officer and former flame of Camille's adoptive French mother, Eliane (Catherine Deneuve). Eliane has the officer dispatched to a northern outpost, Devil's Island. The infatuated girl follows him, taking us on an exquisite travelogue. It might have been called Indo-Sheen.
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