Arts and Entertainment

The very ethos of his practice is rooted in a 1960s American obsession with the implications of space travel and, with that, an embedded fear of otherness,” writes the Guggenheim’s Nancy Spector in her introduction to this 30-year retrospective of Crewdson’s work.

FILM / Chameleon confidence required

JONATHAN LYNN'S Yes Minister showed the British body politic as a shadowy world of eminences grises and sly impositions. Now the director has gone to Washington with The Distinguished Gentleman, a gaily-coloured, red, white and blue sort of place with nothing subtle about it at all. Eddie Murphy plays one of his brash imposters, Thomas Jefferson Johnson, a small-time con artist who has the same name as his local congressman. When the latter prematurely expires in the midst of his re-election campaign, Murphy realises that the congressional scamfest of honoraria and outright backhanders will enable him to swindle big-time (and legally too). He runs for office on the Johnson ticket and is voted in forthwith on 'name recognition'.

CINEMA / The lightness of not seeing

AL PACINO has always acted with his eyes. With their heavy, two-tier lids, they're out of scale with the rest of his body, offsetting his small frame and sidling walk. In the Godfather trilogy they travelled from the steady surmise of youth to the hollow stare of respectability. In his recent films, as his louche charm has bordered on harassment, they've been his last contact with sensitivity. Either way, the eyes have it.

Letter: Tilda Swinton

READERS of last Sunday's interview with Tilda Swinton ('The experience of being Tilda', Review) will be pleased to know that they have not missed the ICA's tribute to her work, as was suggested by your writer. The season of her films started on 10 March, runs until the 28th, and features the highlights of her career.

The experience of being Tilda: Tilda Swinton has spent her career in the cutlish, shoestring end of theatre, less involved in acting than in art. If fame means giving up her own weird way of doing it, is she interested?

TILDA SWINTON'S long reddish hair is pulled back from her forehead and tied in a bun; she wears spectacles with thick black plastic frames, flared high-waisted grey flannel trousers, a blue crew-neck jersey, and a panelled puffy anorak. She is 31. She says: 'I'm very fortunate to have been born when I was.'

Edinburgh International Film Festival highlights

The centrepiece of the festival is a revival of Hans- Jurgen Syberberg's gargantuan, seven hour-plus Hitler - A Film From Germany (Tues 18 Aug, 2.00, Filmhouse), which can best be described as a mixed-media film essay. It's part of a tribute to one of the quirkier talents to emerge from the New German Cinema; also included are Ludwig (Sun 16 Aug 8.15, Filmhouse) and Parsifal (Fri 21 Aug, 6.15, Filmhouse). Syberberg will be in attendance and is directing a production of Ein Traum, was sonst? in the Edinburgh International Festival. Watch out, too, for another distinguished visitor, the gruff, cigar-chomping Sam Fuller, who will be dispensing wit and wisdom on the art of cinema (Sat 22 Aug, 2.30, BBC Scotland, 5 Queen St).

TELEVISION / Facing out the enemy

'ANOTHER Night of Rubbish on the Telly' announced the credits for Screenplay's production of Manfred Karge's play 'Man to Man' (BBC 2). Come, come - it was a bit trying here and there but not as bad as all that, surely? Karge's play, or rather Tilda Swinton's performance, was a chatterer's favourite at the Edinburgh festival a couple of years ago - one of those events which maddeningly become both unmissable and inaccessible. Now everyone who had to endure the malicious enthusiasm of those who went early ('You really must see it but I hear tickets are very hard to get') had a chance to see what all the fuss was about.
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