Voices A US Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan

Watch out, within five years 7,500 drones may be plying American airspace

Would-be high-fliers rush for Dome job

MORE THAN 1,000 hopefuls yesterday rang a hotline to train as acrobats for the Millennium Dome.

Arts: You can't always get what you want ... even though the taxman does

They got no satisfaction out of their recent fiscal negotiations, but then the Rolling Stones have always been careful not to give too much to the Inland Revenue. By Pierre Perrone

Books: The apocalypse, now and then

Peter Jukes wonders if the time has come to curb our taste for millennial fantasy; Living at the End of the World by Marina Benjamin Picador, pounds 12.99

Times-a-changing for Radio 2

SHOOTING STARS frontman Mark Lamarr and former Squeeze star Jools Holland have been signed up as presenters by BBC Radio 2 in an attempt by the station establish a trendier image and capture the "fortysomething" market.

Media: New Royal Opera chief aims to keep out the riffraff

The new chairman of the Royal Opera House does not want to sit next to someone in smelly shorts and trainers. David Lister, Arts News Editor, meets Covent Garden's outspoken new leader.

Fashion: How to become a movie star in six (not so) easy steps

Helena Bonham Carter wanted to look the part for the London premiere of her new film `The Wings of the Dove' on Wednesday. Tamsin Blanchard watched the transformation.

THE IMAGE MAKER

Is Peter Lindbergh the world's greatest fashion photographer? Ian Phillips met him - and thinks the answer may be yes

Dance: Personal space in the balance

The edges of what is dance and what's not are blurring so fast these days that the heading of a column like this is becoming less an indicator of content, more a reminder of the gulf between mainstream and fringe. The small company that calls itself Slack Dance, what's more, seems determined to muddy the waters with a wilful misnomer. Dance it certainly ain't, and slack? What I saw at The Place on Thursday night was as taut as cut glass on a highwire, yet the movements of the two protagonists rarely strayed from the sort of everyday gestures you and I make when we get up and walk to a door.

Cool stamps tell the tale of a rhythm 'n' blues travellin' man

ROBERT CRAY keeps his blue American passport in pristine condition with a little green leather cover that he bought in Dublin. He laughs: "I bought the cover in a gift shop. It has `passport' written on it, and it's made for American tourists like me!"

Just don't say the S-word

Sex has become a game of narcissism which only the young - or young looking - are invited to play. Anna Raeburn reflects

Nonie Niesewand

On the 20th anniversary of Elvis's death, 16 August, Tribute stages a concert at Wembley called Sound and Vision 1996-56. Trolling back through 40 years of rock music, the show ends with four numbers written by Elvis and sung by the stars on stage - kd lang, Rod Stewart, Mary J Blige, Robert Palmer, Steve Winwood, Bon Jovi and Seal.

Election '97: Major flies in face of opposition

Election tour '97: Party chiefs put thousands of miles under their belts as campaign finally draws to a close

POPPING THE DEATH MYTH

Hard on the crepe heels of Tom Hanks's gluey, bubblegum evocation of 1960s pop That Thing You Do! comes Grace of My Heart, a film about 1960s songwriters at the Brill Building hit factory, by film-maker Allison Anders, director of Gas Food and Lodging and Mi Vida Loca. The film stars Illeana Douglas as Denise Waverly, a Carole King-like songwriter who spends that mythologised decade penning hits on a pop production line for producer Joel Millner (John Turturro) and failing at relationships with a string of songwriters, journos and producers.

Obituary: Richard Berry

"Duh duh duh, duh duh; duh duh duh, duh duh." You know how it goes. "Louie Louie, me gotta go . . ." A million garage bands (including the Kingsmen, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Kinks, Iggy Pop and the Stooges, Motorhead, and Bruce Springsteen) have immortalised those simple chords.

Obituary: Billy MacKenzie

Billy MacKenzie had the voice of an angel. Once you'd heard MacKenzie, the singer with The Associates, you were either hooked and became a fan, or your teeth were on edge every time one of his records came on the radio.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?