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Istanbul aggressively increased its overnight lending rate to 12% from 7.75%

Nintendo and Sony shares surge at rumours of China console ban reversal

The official China Daily newspaper quotes an unnamed source from the Ministry of Culture as saying 'We are reviewing the policy...'

More stimulus for ailing economy

Japan's central bank has pumped an extra ¥10 trillion (£73bn) into its spluttering economy as policymakers pledged to review the nation's inflation target in the wake of Shinzo Abe's landslide election victory.

Former chief Woodford attacks Olympus financing plan

Olympus' former chief executive Michael Woodford yesterday dismissed as "desperate" reports that the board which ousted him is now considering tapping rival firms such as Sony and Fujifilm to raise as much as $1.3bn (£830m) in new capital.

Asian stock markets fall over EU fears

Asian stock markets fell today as criticism by ratings agencies sparked scepticism about a historic European Union plan to fix a massive debt crisis by binding member economies closer together.

Asian stocks hit by European crisis

Setbacks in Europe's efforts to isolate a debt crisis before it blows up into an all-out recession sent Asian stock markets tumbling today.

Silvio Berlusconi rumours cheer markets

The prospect of Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi stepping down teased investors back to the market today although concerns remain over his country's increasingly fragile finances.

Growth boost fails to dispel gloom

Better-than-expected UK growth figures were today overshadowed by a manufacturing slump and grim predictions the economy could yet collapse back into recession.

Tokyo curbs record-high yen

The yen dropped to a three-month low against the dollar yesterday after Japan intervened in the market to curb its currency's rise.

Fukushima shutdown may take 30 years

A Japanese government panel says it will take at least 30 years to safely close the tsunami-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, even though the facility is leaking far less radiation than before and is considered relatively stable.

WPP cuts forecasts but 2012 prospects 'not dire'

WPP yesterday cut its growth forecasts for the full year as pressure in the US and at its market research business caused revenues to slow in the three months to the end of September.

James Moore: Executive pay system is clearly broken, if not bent

One group seemingly immune to the impact of inflation, unemployment, economic stagnation and all the other woes afflicting this country is the men (it's usually men) who sit around the boardroom tables of Britain's biggest public companies. Income Data Services (IDS), which totted up pay, bonuses and various share awards, says FTSE 100 directors pocketed an average 49 per cent rise in the last financial year to bring their annual remuneration to an average £2.7m. Chief executives made do with a 43 per cent rise, poor lambs.

'Greedy' FTSE directors enjoy 49% pay rise...

The directors of Britain's largest companies were last night dubbed "elite greedy pigs" for pocketing a 49 per cent pay rise in the past year.

Rebels win pitch battle to give club pause for thought

The bid by Chelsea to buy back the freehold of Stamford Bridge was defeated at a stormy meeting yesterday in which the club's supporters angrily rejected the proposal endorsed by owner Roman Abramovich with a sufficiently large proportion of "No" votes.

Chelsea fans from all walks of life... but united in anger

There was a man who watched his first game at Stamford Bridge in 1942. There was a woman who defied her Tottenham Hotspur-supporting father to follow Chelsea in the 1970s. There was a Chelsea-supporting QC who used words like "farrago" with accomplished ease, and knew his way around company law. There was a well-spoken man called Charles who said he felt "alienated" by the behaviour of the Chelsea board.

James Moore: Enough already. It's time to shake up the system used to set executive pay awards

Outlook One group seemingly immune to the impact of inflation, unemployment, economic stagnation and all the other woes afflicting this country is the men (it's usually men) who sit around the boardroom tables of Britain's biggest public companies.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
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Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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