Johnson at Stone Henge earlier today

Michael Johnson lights up Stone Henge with Olympic Torch

One of the world's greatest ever athletes carried the Olympic Torch around Stonehenge at sunrise today.

Riordan: His major work was on sport under communism

Jim Riordan: Russianist and children's author

James Riordan, a self-proclaimed "working class oik from Portsmouth" and known to everyone as Jim, rose to become a respected Russianist, translator and author of over 20 books, including the standard studies of sport in the Soviet Union. He also claimed to be the first Briton to play for a Russian professional football team.

Medical staff fight to save the life of Fabrice Muamba at White Hart Lane on Saturday night

James Lawton: Of course football matters, and Muamba shows why it does

Football stars, for all their riches, are not immune from the fears and hazards of us all

Cottrell: 'It is one of my duties to educate you politicians in military and scientific issues,' he told MPs

Sir Alan Cottrell: Government's Scientific Adviser who worked to establish safe nuclear power

For some 70 years the impact of Sir Alan Cottrell's work on the basic understanding of materials and its application to engineering structures, his academic leadership, his role of Scientific Adviser to the Government, and his contributions to safe nuclear energy, have been immense. He was the most influential physical metallurgist of the 20th century. Through his pioneering researches, and as an educator, he influenced countless students, scientists and engineers and will continue to do so. His papers and books are remarkable for their clarity.

Emelia Gorecka crosses the line at the European Cross-country Championships

London Eye: Cross-country trail runs through Woods

The best-known member of Aldershot, Farnham and District Athletics Club – past or present – has been in the news this week. It was announced on Tuesday that Zola Budd is to run in the 56-mile Comrades Marathon in South Africa in June – the ultimate running challenge for the woman who famously tangled with Mary Decker in the 3,000m at the Los Angeles Olympics in 1984.

Form of Ecstasy may help to combat cancer

Modified forms of the drug Ecstasy may be effective against leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma, early research has suggested.

Simple test can detect heart defects in babies

All new babies should be routinely screened for life-threatening heart defects using a simple and painless test, researchers say. The pulse oximetry test measures blood oxygen levels in newborns using a small skin sensor on the hands or feet.

Professor Noreen Murray: Scientist whose work paved the way for genetic engineering

Noreen Murray was recognised internationally as being one of Britain's most distinguished and highly respected molecular geneticists.

Business Diary: New bank boss is your real high flier

Our congratulations to Diana Layfield, who was appointed regional chief executive officer for Africa by Standard Chartered Bank yesterday. Ms Layfield shouldn't have too many problems finding her way round in her new post: her impressive CV, which boasts an education from Oxford University and Harvard plus a stint at McKinsey & Co, also reveals that Layfield spent two years piloting relief planes for the International Committee of the Red Cross and United Nations in Africa.

Scientists claim to have created 'invisibility cloak'

Scientists have built an "invisibility cloak" that can hide everyday objects by splitting light.

Lives Remembered: Michael Green

Michael Green, who collapsed and died suddenly at his home in Birmingham on 14 December, was an academic who helped to establish the discipline of cultural studies at the pioneering Birmingham Centre for Cultural Studies. His death shocked and deeply saddened the many who knew and respected him, both friends and colleagues, as well as his close family. He was in his mid-60s.

Abraham Lincoln is not an American, decides Spielberg

Patriots 'will be unhappy' that their most admired president will be portrayed in movie by a Briton

Back to the beginning: Hadron Collider creates mini-Big Bang

British scientists celebrate groundbreaking experiment that generated temperatures a million times hotter than the Sun's centre

Large Hadron Collider creates miniature 'big bangs'

Mini-versions of the "Big Bang" which gave birth to the universe almost 14 billion years ago have been created within the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the giant machine probing the nature of matter near Geneva.

It's official: A small dose of Prozac can help beat PMS

Treatment could be universally available within two years
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent