Letter: Hungarian hero too outspoken

Sir: Jonathan Eyal's erudite defence of the need by Nato not to neglect Romania in the likely event of Hungary's admission to that organisation by the end of the decade (letter, 18 September) sounds persuasive now that both countries have agreed to sign an inter-state treaty.

It's strangeness that sells

The British Association's conference is the year's biggest public science event. Charles Arthur asks why it attracts more virtual visitors than real ones, and, below right, rounds up some of the best stories

Radar reveals Roman secrets

Archaeologists discovered that a Roman settlement in Wroxeter, Shropshire was as big as Pompeii - without touching the ground that covers it. They used ground-penetrating radar, coupled with magnetic and electrical analysis of the soil, to draw up a plan of the fourth-largest city from Roman times.

Labour pledges facts and figures clean-up

Labour would set up an independent arm's-length National Statistical Service to restore public faith in official statistics, Jack Straw, the party's home affairs spokesman, said yesterday.

Putting a price on the life of a child

DEATH OF JAYMEE BOWEN

Wartime prisoner sues after 50 years

German-born grandmother Gertrude Timmis is to seek compensation from the government after she was interned during the Second World War for what she believes was a "clerical error".

A benchmark for magistrates

Nobody wants Britain's 30,000 JPs to be clones, but could training make them more consistent? A recent project may provide the answer

Letter: How to be Jewish

From Ms Elisabeth Meggitt

Billion-pound atoms

One day nano-technology could turn this futuristic vision into reality, sending tiny robots into the human body to fight disease. And someone will make a killing 'Library in the palm of your hand'

Could you be a fitness junkie?

It may begin in a healthy vein but, if you get hooked, a trip to the gym may not work out well. David Cohen meets an aerobics addict

Hotline exposes campus racism

The first comprehensive study of racism on Britain's college campuses has exposed the alarming rise of Islamic extremist groups which have targeted Jewish activists with death threats.

What lies at the bottom of chromosome 11?

Thanks to the efforts of two mothers, an international research team has tracked down the defective gene that causes a very rare disease. Ruth McKernan reports

The dirty tricks that were made in England

Scott Lucas on how a Labour government made propaganda war on Russians

Cuba cashes in on transplants

Fidel Castro's Cuban government tried to earn badly needed foreign currency by encouraging the transplant of brain tissue from still-warm foetuses to wealthy foreign victims of Parkinson's disease.

Surgeon turns her back on Castro's `brain trade'

Cuba's transplant industy: World-renowned neuro-surgeon in revolt over her country's use of foetal tissue to earn hard currency
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project