Howls and wry laughter in court

'A Bill will be introduced,' said Her Majesty, in that polite but faintly surprised tone perfected for reading out her various governments' wheezes, 'to strengthen the administration of magistrates' courts.' They are, on the whole, solemn places, magistrates' courts. Yet strange noises echoed within the panelled walls of half the magistrates' courts in the country on Thursday, as Her Majesty opened Parliament. 'A howl of depression,' said one London magistrates' clerk, 'mixed with a wry laugh.'

Extra cost of NHS changes challenged: Nicholas Timmins reports that 30,000 new posts have brought no obvious care benefits

PRESSURE on health ministers to justify the extra costs of the National Health Service market mounted yesterday when a health authority chairman broke ranks to say there was no evidence that more patients had been treated as a result.

Health Update: Deadly chickenpox

CHICKENPOX in adults can be fatal, a researcher from the University of Birmingham has warned. Dr Neil Steven reports in MIMS Magazine the recent death of a young man who caught the disease from his five-year-old daughter. The most common complications in adults, says Dr Steven, are inflammation of the lungs and brain. Acyclovir, an antiviral drug, has just been licensed for use for chickenpox in all adults and children and may reduce the severity of an attack.

Judges of history in the making: A group of academics who foresaw Soviet collapse reconvened recently. Julian Bullard was there

CHAPTER XVI of Baroness Thatcher's memoirs is entitled 'Men to Do Business with'. It opens with an account of a seminar she convened at Chequers on 8 September 1983 'to pick the brains of experts on the Soviet Union' - meaning not the reigning ministers and mandarins in Whitehall, but specialist academics.

Health: My God, he asked for carrots]: Eileen Fursland offers parents tips on weaning a child off sweet foods

Who hasn't resorted to bribing a child at some time? 'Just a spoonful of carrots and then you can have some lovely pudding . . .' But, says an American psychologist, bribery is one of several mistakes parents make when it comes to persuading children to eat 'healthy' food.

Private care for mentally ill shows abrupt rise: Increase revealed as fear over costs grows

A rapid rise in private hospital beds for the mentally ill was revealed yesterday by a government-commissioned study.

Home Computer: Open Forum

I think that I may be able to help your correspondents Jane Dalton and M Davies over their problems with diacritical signs (accents) in foreign-language word-processing.

Law: Training the advice squad: Fiona Bawdon reports on new plans to give police station suspects better help improve the advice given to suspects

THE TAPE of a suspect being harangued and bullied by police until he falsely confesses to a murder - with his solicitor sitting by saying nothing - is to be used in training to try to improve the quality of police station advisers.

Errors by judges key to appeal success: Quashed convictions often due to mistakes

JUDGES' mistakes are by far the most common ground for successful appeals against convictions, it was disclosed yesterday.

Letter: A curriculum that fails in teaching English

Sir: The Council for University English held its annual general meeting on 17 April at the University of Birmingham. The council is the national representative body for all university teachers of English literature and language. At that meeting we had the opportunity to discuss in detail the current revision of the Order for English in the national curriculum. We wish to place on record our strong opposition to that revision.

Battle lines drawn in the fight to decide future of tourism in the Lakes: Malcolm Pithers reports on the moulding of Cumbria

SOME of nature's jewels lie hidden among the hills, often shrouded in rolling mists, giving only captivating glimpses of the angry beauty of the place. These magical places are the very essence of the Lake District. But nowadays more and more people are seeking such hideaways, and therein lies the problem.

Letter: High price of change in public services

Sir: It is usually going to be funny when a thousand words of journalism promises to give meaning to otherwise meaningless abstractions. Andrew Marr did not disappoint (23 February).

Ending right to silence 'will not increase convictions'

ABOLITION of the right to silence of suspects under police interrogation would affect only a small number of cases and would be unlikely to increase convictions of guilty people, according to research conducted for the Royal Commission on Criminal Justice, writes Terry Kirby.

Letter: Legal leeches

Sir: Your obituary of US Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall (26 January) quotes his mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston, who 'insisted that we be social engineers rather than lawyers'.

Letter: Courts add insult to victims' injury

Sir: There is a glaring omission in the survey of criminal justice for the Royal Commission (9 December): neither victims nor other witnesses were asked for their views. An independent survey by researchers from the University of Birmingham, published by Victim Support in 1991, found that prosecution witnesses felt fear at the prospect of appearing in court, exacerbated by inadequate notice of hearings, lack of information about court proceedings and shared waiting areas. In particular:
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Ukraine crisis: The phoney war is over as Russian troops and armour pour across the border

The phoney war is over

Russian troops and armour pour into Ukraine
Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

The world’s entire food system is under attack - and Britain is most at risk, according to a new study
Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Seoul's plastic surgery industry is booming thanks to the popularity of the K-Pop look
From Mozart to Orson Welles: Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

After the death of Sandy Wilson, 90, who wrote his only hit musical in his twenties, John Walsh wonders what it's like to peak too soon and go on to live a life more ordinary
Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Fears are mounting that Vladimir Putin has instructed hackers to target banks like JP Morgan
Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years

Salomé: A head for seduction

Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years. Now audiences can meet the Biblical femme fatale in two new stage and screen projects
From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library's latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic

British Library celebrates all things Gothic

Forthcoming exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination will be the UK's largest ever celebration of Gothic literature
The Hard Rock Café's owners are embroiled in a bitter legal dispute - but is the restaurant chain worth fighting for?

Is the Hard Rock Café worth fighting for?

The restaurant chain's owners are currently embroiled in a bitter legal dispute
Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival

In search of Caribbean soul food

Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival
11 best face powders

11 best face powders

Sweep away shiny skin with our pick of the best pressed and loose powder bases
England vs Norway: Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Lack of Englishmen at leading Premier League clubs leaves manager hamstrung
Angel Di Maria and Cristiano Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

Di Maria and Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

They both inherited the iconic shirt at Old Trafford, but the £59.7m new boy is joining a club in a very different state
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone