News German cockroaches - smaller than the famous American cockroach - have evolved to lose their sweet tooth

The creature crawled into his ear as he slept

Investment Column: Bananas ripen for Fyffes

AFTER a lean couple of years, bananas have started to bear fruit for Fyffes. The Irish fresh food group, which distributes two of every five bananas sold in the UK, benefited from firmer prices across the European Union and reported a 15 per cent rise in interim pre-tax profits to IRpounds 23m.

Be ordinary and make your millions

IF YOU had to name three particularly ordinary activities at random how about these? Having a cup of coffee, taking the bus to work, and vacuuming the living room. Ordinary, even boring. But those three activities have made three spectacular fortunes. Read on.

Theatre: Tomorrow's World Today

Some mornings, pushing a soft, plastic button and smiting an ergonomically- designed computer keyboard in order to log on (clocking in, so to speak) is as much 'work' as a person can bring themselves to do until they've had a stiff cup of tea and read the job ads. This five-second process is as unremarkable a daily routine as smiling at the receptionist or hanging up your coat. Had you been one of the first schoolchildren to learn how to use a computer, however, you may appreciate the effort that has gone into making it such a simple process.

Bagless wonder taken to cleaners

WHICH? consumer magazine yesterday entered the dust-up between rival vacuum-cleaner makers.

THE TRUTH ABOUT... Laying a path

LAYING a path should in theory be simple enough: a matter of slapping down some paving stones or cobbles or bits of wood in an aesthetically pleasing fashion, in such formation as to keep everybody's feet out of the mud underneath. In fact, installing a concrete or paving-slab path is an operation akin to resurfacing the M25, though on a slightly smaller scale. It involves digging a trench, adding a layer of hardcore, then either pouring in the concrete or adding a layer of sand and placing the slabs on top. Bricks are even worse: a brick path involves similar hard labour plus attempting to lay the things out in a fancy pattern (if you don't know your basketweave bond from your herringbone pattern, beware). Bricks also need some form of permanent edging or they will make a slow but determined attempt to escape, and they also need a firm hand to squish them down into their sandy bed (the extremely patient can use a piece of board and a club hammer, those with other commitments outside the garden will end up hiring a very scary petrol-driven plate vibrator). Attempting any of these on curved or wiggly paths multiplies the labour and headache factor by 20 (approx).

Outlook: First taste of Argos's defence

FOR A retailer that never seems to have moved out of the 1970s, Argos has suddenly come over all designer trendy. Instead of its usual grey presentations the company yesterday hired the London Weekend Television studios to regale audiences with its new retail strategy. There were lots of yellow kettles and bright red vacuum cleaners everywhere and, up on the podium, new chief executive Stuart Rose was reading from his autocue with all the aplomb of a seasoned Oscars presenter. Amazing what a hostile bid can do.

Doctor's boyfriend 'was like a timebomb'

THE murdered doctor Joan Francisco was warned that her alleged killer, Tony Diedrick, was "a walking time bomb", the High Court heard yesterday.

Family of murdered doctor launch civil action against her ex-boyfriend

THE FAMILY of a young doctor who was murdered more than three years ago yesterday launched an unprecedented High Court civil action against her former boyfriend whom they suspect of killing her.

Blood, sweat and sawdust

INTERIOR MOTIVES

The precise science of a great sleepover party

Not many people have slept in space. But every month more than 100 children lie in the darkness gazing at the the Apollo 10 Command module.

Briton looks to create power vacuum in Japan

BUNHILL

New Year Honours: CBE for inventor whose new design cleaned up

The inventor of the bag-less vacuum cleaner, James Dyson, whose revolutionary "cyclone" design ousted giants Hoover and Electrolux from the top of the British market, has been rewarded with a CBE.

Property: Doctor On The House: Only boffins can keep their cool with bo ilers

We're too darned hot. So please give us central heating with programmes we can follow, begs Jeff Howell

Thirty-seven hours (not) at home with the agony family Atkins

A 12-year-old girl disappears from home. Her mother is `The Daily Telegraph' agony aunt, Christian, moralising. What, asks Virginia Ironside, can one say?

Clean-living robot moves into the sitting room

In his novel 3001, the science fiction writer Arthur C Clarke envisaged a future where tiny household robots came out at night to take care of domestic chores while humans were asleep. That dream looks set to move a little closer to reality - with the advent of the self-operating vacuum cleaner.
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence