Life and Style

Former bodybuilding champion Jim Morris still has an amazing physique, which he credits to his veganism

Turn veggie to save planet, says Sir Paul

Ex-Beatle claims eating less meat is 'single most effective way' to cut emissions

A casserole of winter vegetables with rosemary

Serves 4

Vanilla Black, 17-18 Took's Court, London EC4

It's hardly surprising that the churn rate among newspaper restaurant reviewers is slower than the industry average. Why would anyone voluntarily give up a job that allows them to travel the country, eating and drinking? You'd have to prise this gig out of my cold, dead hand.

The ad agency that turned into a fast-food business

What happens when you encourage creatives to develop business ideas? Ian Burrell finds out

Mokogodo: "Baboons stole the fruit-scented soap from my bathroom"

Paul Bloomfield enjoys the hospitality of the Mokogodo people

Susan Calman: Maybe It Is Your Fault, The Stand, Edinburgh

As a former corporate lawyer who has broken free of professional shackles and is now not afraid to say what she thinks, I expected more insight from the Glaswegian comic Susan Calman. Her debut Fringe show does indicate that she has a forceful persona, without being overbearing, and she tries to give her jokes oomph.

Animal rights group turns its fire on celebrity meat-eaters

After helping to make fur coats taboo, campaigners at Peta are using hardline tactics on A-list carnivores

Paperback: In the Dark, by Deborah Moggach

Deborah Moggach's hugely enjoyable 17th novel is set in a rundown lodging house near Southwark during the final years of the First World War. Landlady Eithne Clay has been running the business since the death of her ineffectual husband, helped only by her 16-year-old son, Ralph, and Winnie, her reliable maid. The shabby rooms are home to a dozen or so lost souls including a blind communist, an incontinent old lady and a traumatised war veteran. Into this dreary world strides Neville Turk, a butcher and local black marketeer who has long profited from the fact that "many women would drop their drawers for a pound of mince". Eithne, with pretensions to being genteel, needs more than mince to oblige. She soon finds herself wooed by gifts of glistening lamb chops and crimson top side. Adolescent Ralph, repulsed by this distressingly carnal turn of events, turns vegetarian and tries to get sent to the front, while Winnie seeks solace in an affair of her own.As ever, Moggach deftly weaves politics and social history into a tightly told story of ordinary disappointments and mismatched desires. The battles that are played out in the kitchens of south London may not be quite as grisly as the ones simultaneously being waged on the Western Front, but the damage proves no less severe.

Philip Cullum: An exciting example of what consumers can achieve

The difference between what consumers are offered by each of the major fuel companies is marginal. Depending on your opinion, this is either a sign of a fiercely competitive market or one in which there is little competition. It's probably the latter.

How We Met: Sean Hughes & Mark Eitzel

'The difference between me and Sean is that I'm broke. So I'm a whore and he isn't'

Can you really be a vegetarian if you eat fish?

The lentils and nut cutlets are starting to fly in a food fight that has pitted vegetarians against those who shun meat but eat fish.

Desert life threatened by climate change and human exploitation

The deserts of the world are threatened by a combination of human exploitation and climate change that could, within decades, wipe out many unique habitats and rare species, an authoritative study has found.

Leading article: Healthy change

'It would make a good Ealing comedy,' said our lady of the protest. 'Carry On Hunting!'

Eye witness: Fox-hunters pledge civil disobedience to defy a ban on their sport. By Severin Carrell

Bites

Modern French cooking for vegetarians? Yes, it does exist ...
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent