News Calatrava’s bridge has been heavily criticised

After endless criticism over its aesthetic, its durability and even its accessibility for the disabled,Santiago Calatrava faces legal action as a result of alleged deficiencies in the construction

Venice Film Festival - More highs than lows on the Lido

With politics, pilgrimages and Pixar on the menu, not to mention a gondola fleet of glamorous stars, this year's Venice Film Festival has been a return to form. About time too, says Geoffrey Macnab

Chavez hits Venice with an entourage to shame the stars

The first sign that something unusual was happening at the Venice Film Festival was when the usual group of dark-suited security men were replaced by a bank of armed police blocking both sides of the street at the entrance to the Sala Grande. Accreditations were being thoroughly checked and every bag, no matter how big or small, was given the airport treatment.

Moore on greed: US film-maker has rounded on his Hollywood backers

The documentary film-maker Michael Moore – who has made a fortune out of attacking America's obsession with guns, its health care system and the Iraq war – is not a man to hold his tongue and doff his cap. In fact, far from holding his tongue he has proceeded to bite the hand that feeds and attacked his own studio bosses.

Venice is a Fish, By Tiziano Scarpa trs Shaun Whiteside

Venice is a fish – because it is shaped like a sole. It is also a tortoise, a serial killer and "an uninterrupted Braille handrail", according to the novelist and native Venetian, Tiziano Scarpa. This brief, lyrical meditation on a unique city is not your usual travel book. It pointedly refuses to name a single hotel, restaurant, bar or shop, advising the tourist to wander aimlessly and get themselves lost.

Baaria, Venice Film Festival

A poor relation to Paradiso

Lights go up on the Lido

The Venice Film Festival is often compared unfavourably with its Cannes and Toronto competitors. But this year could change all that

Our national love affair with Venice

For centuries, English writers and artists have fallen in love with Venice. Peter Ackroyd, literary Londoner, is the latest. Peter Popham celebrates the seductive city

Death in Venice – but this time it's Bogarde's beach

Scene immortalised by Dirk Bogarde film will be lost under plans to develop sand dunes. Michael Day reports on the backlash

Venice Is a Fish, By Tiziano Scarpa

A "vast sole", to be precise, caught by a fishing line in the form of the causeway that links it to the mainland. Scarpa's luminous tribute (translated by Shaun Whiteside) won't tell you where to go ("Getting lost is the only place worth getting to"), but he does tell you how to enjoy Venice through hands ("Block a drinking fountain and send three-metre geysers gushing from the spout") and mouth (fried sardines marinaded in onions and vinegar will "flabbergast your taste buds...").

Observations: Caledonia Curry's slow boat to Venice

For those who didn't catch Caledonia Curry's (aka Swoon's) less than conventional entrance at this year's Venice Biennale in a fleet of ships, a trip to London's Black Rat Gallery this week was a chance to see her life-size figurative woodcuts, made of scrap wood and rubbish from skips, which usually inhabit her cityscape installations. Curry, 31, a multidisciplinary artist, rocked up to Venice with her 30-strong crew in a small fleet of boats, each 20ft high and wide, and crafted from bed sheets, car parts and scrap metal. Onlookers rubbed their eyes in disbelief as she emerged from the horizon quite unannounced.

Penny admits he was wrong on 'blockbusters'

When Dr Nicholas Penny joined the National Gallery as its director early last year, he was reported to be turning his back on "big-name, big-audience" blockbuster art exhibitions in favour of more erudite, obscure names.

Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy

Britain's chosen artist, Steve McQueen, shuns the biennale razzmatazz to screen an intriguing film about Venice

From Steve McQueen's spooky pavilion projections to John Cale's torture film, video art triumphs at the Venice Biennale

Film. Film. Film. It seems to have spread like a stain through the Venice Biennale this year. The Brits have chosen filmmaker Steve McQueen as their official representative. The Welsh have John Cale, co-founder of Velvet Underground and newly into film, and Northern Ireland has opted for Susan MacWilliam, who makes films about the paranormal. Scottish artist, Martin Boyce has demurred, instead filling seven rooms at the Palazzo Pisani with giant stepping stones, steel chandeliers and over 20,000 fake leaves. Elsewhere, Fiona Tan is showing films in the Dutch pavilion and film-maker Mark Lewis is representing the Canadians.

Naked displays of nationalism at opening of Venice Biennale

Steve McQueen makes waves as Britain's representative at arts festival

Dress Code: Nanette Lepore, Designer

What are you wearing right now?

My favourite asymmetrical ruffled leather miniskirt from my summer collection, with a plain T-shirt.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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