Vivienne Westwood

The Miu Miu London members' club

The concept of a working man’s club was turned on its head for three days this week, as a host of female models, actors and fashionable creatives were invited to enjoy an exclusive pop-up members only club courtesy of Miuccia Prada.

Rock on: How celebrity jeweller Stephen Webster transformed the image

Mind yer head," says Stephen Webster, indicating the low-hung chandelier with the giant crystal globes, "Mickey Rourke bashed 'is head on that, an' I thought 'e was done for." We are closeted together in the tiny buyer's boudoir at Webster's flagship store in Mayfair, surrounded by photographs of his devoted clients: Kate, Sienna, Madonna, Sharon, Jennifer... If the plush sofa in here could talk, it would purr for hours about the fabulousness of the celebrities that have perched on it, discussing gems with Mr Webster.

Charting emotion: What makes me happy

Researchers have tried to quantify how happy people are by charting the emotion on an index. From Tuesday, it is the turn of the arts to explain happiness, with a new exhibition aiming to express the emotion through objects.

Westwood takes a walk on the wild side

Super-elevated, cobalt blue Gillie platforms so high even Naomi Campbell took a catwalk tumble in a pair in 1993, equally vertiginous wooden "rocking horse" soles and, of course, the famous "pirate" boot first shown in 1981 and a bestseller to this day. These are just some of Vivienne Westwood's best-loved shoe designs, featured in the new fashion and textile gallery at the Bowes Museum in Barnard Castle, Co Durham, from today until 10 July.

Westwood redesigns Brits for a new era

The Brit Awards – those bronze, helmeted female statuettes that have served as the Oscars of the British music industry for more than three decades – are to be given a makeover by the high priestess of punk, Vivienne Westwood.

Diary: Kasabian's loss, Oxfam's gain

Elton John opened his own pop-up shop in Covent Garden to sell his old outfits. Kylie Minogue's costumes were the subject of an exhibition at the V&A. Yet despite being the frontman for the band named "Best Act in the World Today" at this week's Q Awards, Kasabian's Tom Meighan chose to dispose of the contents of his wardrobe at his local branch of Oxfam, in Leicester. The singer recently made two trips to deposit more than 100 items at the charity shop, including an £800 Vivienne Westwood jacket, signed T-shirts and Leicester City football strips. Meighan wore many of the garments at gigs and festivals; they have, allegedly, been washed since. "He was quite interested in how much money we made," store manager Ahsan Sheikh told the Leicester Mercury. "I said I'd let him know." (Let us know, too!) Among the apparel from Meighan's collection available to buy online is a pair of black jeans, which staff have helpfully placed in the "Women's Clothing" section of the store's website. Hmm. I always thought they looked a bit tight.

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That's showbiz

"It was the most unpleasant thing that has ever happened to me while filming – having my undercarriage dealt with by gaffer tape."

Andrew Marr dons a vintage bathing suit for the filming of A History of Modern Britain

Tweed all about it

It’s big on the grouse moor and hot on the catwalk, yet Scotland’s favourite fabric is having a rough time. John Walsh on an industry that’s falling apart at the seams

Nothing like a dame: How Vivienne Westwood traded a couture lifestyle

Vivienne Westwood would rather we saved the planet than bought her dresses these days, and her campaign against global warming has taken her everywhere from the G20 protests to... a first-class seat on a Virgin Atlantic flight? Harriet Walker listens in as the maverick fashion designer persuades Richard Branson, the airline's owner, to join her mission

Parties: A day at the races

Ascot hasn't been this cool since Cecil Beaton did the costumes for My Fair Lady. Providing a sartorial sanctuary in a sea of safe dresses and high-street hats, British designers Luella Bartley, Vivienne Westwood, Gieves & Hawkes and milliner Stephen Jones demonstrated the art of breaking the rules. Their fashion show took place during a four-course lunch at the Bessborough Restaurant, where models including William Gladstone's great-great-great granddaughter, Olivia Inge, strode the catwalk while a champagne-fuelled audience whooped with approval.