Arts and Entertainment

Colditz; the Great Escape; Bridge on the River Kwai and, recently, the Railway Man. Parodies of them by everyone from Beyond the Fringe to Russ Abbott. All second world war. Memoir after memoir. And yet with the single, powerful exception of the French classic La Grande Illusion, the prisoners of the Great War have gone largely unchronicled.

Despite darkness, New Yorker stands up for his neighbourhood in superstorm's aftermath

Before the storm, it would have been a familiar setting here in lower Manhattan: a man behind the counter, a row of lottery tickets above him and a wall of cigarettes behind him.

Market Report: BG Group nosedive sparks takeover talk

Huge share price falls get the City chattering about takeovers. The 13 per cent slump in BG Group's share price sparked just that yesterday.Dealers in the square mile were already gossiping by lunch time that the oil and gas group could be a takeover target for Shell.

Ed Miliband criticises mental illness 'belittlers' Jeremy Clarkson and Janet Street-Porter

Ed Miliband today criticised media personalities Jeremy Clarkson and Janet Street-Porter for belittling people with mental illness and contributing towards the stigma that sufferers feel.

Climate change protesters arrested at site of gas-fired power station

Five climate change protesters have been arrested on suspicion of aggravated trespass at the site of a gas-fired power station.

In Jerusalem, even street naming can be divisive

In East Jerusalem, addresses in many Palestinian neighborhoods are nonexistent. Without street names and house numbers, people identify where they live by adjacent landmarks: "opposite the mosque," or "next to the corner bakery."

Errors and Omissions: Can you only be stabbed in a frenzied attack?

Our legendary pedant on hunting in and outdoors, the art of not giving everything away, and Boris Johnson's sporting achievements

Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta

Virus that struck Mideast energy firms was worst cyberattack yet, Panetta says

NEW YORK — A computer virus that wiped crucial business data from tens of thousands of computers at Middle Eastern energy companies over the summer marked the most destructive cyberattack on the private sector to date, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Thursday night in a major speech intended to warn of the growing perils in cyberspace.

Typhoid fever vaccination recalled

Health experts could face a shortage in typhoid fever vaccination stocks after they were forced to recall a batch which is not potent enough.

How to ensure Indian girls go to school? Install
a proper lavatory

Six-month deadline set for government to offer basic facilities to boost education and reduce 'open defecation'

Video: Mitt Romney's bin man dishes the dirt

In a rebuke to Mitt Romney's now notorious comments on the 47 per cent of Americans he sees as scroungers, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) have released a video.

A block of flats in Newburn, Newcastle had to be evacuated after floods washed away its foundations

Flooded communities counting costs of storms

Communities in flooded parts of the UK are counting the cost of the most intense September storm for 30 years as swollen river levels start to recede.

Torrential rain on the Aberystwyth promenade yesterday

Washout Britain's wettest summer in a century

The washout summer ending today was the wettest in Britain for 100 years, the Met Office has said.

UK launches anti-cholera campaign

The UK government has activated a £2 million emergency plan to help tackle a cholera epidemic sweeping through Sierra Leone.

Rat killer Shakeel Sheikh, 24, getting ready for work in Mumbai

Mumbai's eager rat catchers on the front line in fight against disease Mumbai's rat catchers serve on the front line in struggle against disease

There is something of a swagger about Vilas Ubhare when he sets about killing a rat. His stick comes down fast, the rat is dispatched and then in a fluid, unbroken motion Mr Ubhare hooks his toe under the rodent's tail, flips the corpse into the air and catches it neatly in a sack. It is like watching a footballer perform tricks in the park.

UK to provide £10m funding boost for Syria refugees

Britain is to give an extra £10 million of funding to help more than 45,000 refugees fleeing the conflict in Syria, the International Development Secretary has announced.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent