News The iconic British brands sold 425,006 vehicles in 2013 - up 19 per cent on 2012

Iconic British brands sold 425,006 vehicles in 2013 - up 19 per cent on 2012 - and set records in 38 international markets

Peter Rabbit set for return in Chorion deal

Beatrix Potter's much-loved cast of children's characters, including Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddle-Duck and Mrs Tiggywinkle, are to make a comeback on British television screens after two decades, thanks to a deal unveiled yesterday by the entertainment company Chorion and the publisher Penguin.

Dubai's debt shakes world markets

Debt-swamped Dubai today asked for a six-month reprieve on paying its bills, causing a drop on world markets.

Fear of 'double dip' haunts global markets

Fund managers pull out of equities as gloom gathers over strength of recovery in UK and US

Mobile giant Nokia recalls danger threat chargers

Mobile phone maker Nokia recalled 14 million potentially dangerous chargers today.

Leading article: A surfeit of crinoline

When a politician says it's not about the money, you know – say observers of American politics – that it's about the money. You could say the same about the BBC and ratings. When their spokespeople insist, as they did yesterday, that it's not about the ratings, you can be pretty sure that this is indeed exactly what it's about – in this case the plummeting number of viewers for Emma, its latest costume drama.

Nuclear group sells commercial arm

A major slice of the country's nuclear expertise is to transfer into private hands after the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) today announced the £50 million sale of its commercial arm.

Last Night's Television - Running in Heels, E4; Tweed, BBC4

Dark side of the loom

Sponsorship deal 'boosts' Liverpool stadium plans

Liverpool managing director Christian Purslow believes the biggest sponsorship deal in the club's history can get their new stadium project back on track.

Hot shots: tequila becomes Britain's spirit of choice

Few liquors can match tequila for its association with endurance drinking and lethal hangovers. For decades, Mexico's national spirit has been at the heart of an unholy alliance with salt, lime and pickled caterpillars to make it the tipple of choice for those in search of cheap and rapid oblivion.

Critics cry foul as President brings free football to Argentina

In a deft offensive manoeuvre, President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner ended a two-week delay in the start of Argentina's football season by signing a $155m-a-year (£94m) deal to broadcast league matches on state television, kicking aside an existing and far less generous cable contract.

Paul Marsh: Literary agent who led the way in the sale of rights to authors' work on the international market

The international literary agent Paul Marsh was celebrated for selling British and international authors around the world and ensuring they were published in many languages. Most authors, and literary novelists in particular, cannot make a living from their domestic sales alone, so they depend heavily on international sales. Paul Marsh was one of the key players in this globalisation of literary culture. He was the consummate broker, linking authors and publishers across a Babel of languages, a charming and energetic promoter of an international culture of books.

David Prosser: Markets at a crossroads

Outlook: The problem with market bull runs is that the higher they go, the more nervous people start to feel

David Prosser: Tata steps up a gear

Outlook: It Is difficult not to feel extremely nervous about the employment prospects of staff at Jaguar Land Rover. Parent company Tata admitted as much yesterday, warning that future job cuts are possible after unveiling a £280m loss at the company in its first 10 months of ownership.

Leading article: What price deregulated energy?

As prices of household energy soared, suppliers had a ready explanation. It was all to do with world market prices. So the not unreasonable assumption made by consumers was that, if prices of household gas and electricity followed wholesale energy prices up, then they could follow them down as well.

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Lake Garda
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Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent