Sport Referee Howard Webb has been selected to officiate at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Webb took charge of the 2010 final, becoming the first Englishman to referee a World Cup final since Jack Taylor in 1974

Last Night's TV: She knew how to make a dramatic exit

The Last Word Monologues, BBC1; Comedy Lab: Headwreckers, Channel 4; Masterchef: The professionals, BBC2

Album: Mahler, Symphony No 5 – Tonhalle Orchestra (RCA Red Seal)

David Zinman's Mahler cycle with the Tonhalle Orchestra is shaping up to be one of the most consistent cycles.

You think you're on safe ground but then subsidence strikes

Wet summers aren't all they're cracked up to be when insurance claims still roll in. Chris Menon surveys the danger signs and sees how to go about fixing the fault lines

Euro 2008 in brief: Henry and Ribéry forced to cut short first training session

Thierry Henry and Franck Ribéry pulled out of France's first training session at their Euro 2008 Swiss base after half an hour on yesterday. Ribéry, who was seen holding his right ankle, received a knock in France's 1-0 win over Colombia in their final warm-up on Tuesday in Paris, a team spokesman said. Henry left the training session to undergo treatment, the spokesman said without elaborating. France captain Patrick Vieira, who will miss his side's opening Group C game against Romania on Monday in Zurich, was back in training for the first time since sustaining a left thigh injury last Friday in training and is more hopeful of keeping his place in the squad.

You write the reviews: Ben Johnson's Liverpool Cityscape 2008 and the World Panorama Series, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

I'm no lover of art, so Ben Johnson's Liverpool Cityscape 2008 and the World Panorama Series exhibition came a distant second to the public lectures featuring Richard Dawkins and Patrick Cockburn in my European Capital of Culture programme. How wrong I was.

Zurich Opera/Strauss Der Rosenkavalier, Royal Festival Hall, London

You can take the boy out of Austria but you can't take Austria out of the boy. Franz Welser-Most has always been a very contained conductor – precise, rhythmic, unfussy – but release him into this entrancing world of a bygone Vienna that even Strauss and his librettist Hugo von Hofmannsthal could only imagine and the instincts of his heritage unconsciously come into play.

Firms sceptical over financial advice plan

The financial services industry gave a lukewarm reception to the Government's proposals to develop a new generic financial advice service yesterday, expressing scepticism over its plans to force insurers and banks to help fund the scheme.

Art worth £80m snatched in daring Zurich gallery raid

Robbers wearing ski masks and brandishing pistols stole Impressionist masterpieces by Cezanne, Monet, Degas and Van Gogh worth more than £80m from a Zurich museum in one of the most spectacular art thefts in Europe for decades, police have said.

Will Self: PsychoGeography - The people's Joyce

Consider the final days of James Joyce – I have. Fleeing from Paris in the dying days of 1939, the Joyces headed south to the village of Saint-Gérand-le-Puy, near Vichy. Here, as the Second World War girded up its annihilating loins, the great confabulator was gripped by stomach pain in his rooms at the Hôtel de la Paix, and harried by dogs if he ventured out with his dark glasses on and with his blind man's cane. When asked why he hated them so much, Joyce replied: "Because they have no souls."

How to get permission to destroy the countryside: say you're building an eco-town

A giant Swiss-based insurance company is seeking permission to build a new town of 12,500 houses in Hampshire by labelling it an "eco-town". If it succeeds, Zurich Financial Services – the sixth biggest insurance group in the world, with annual profits of $4.65bn (£2.4bn) – will be looking at a billion-pound bonanza.

Wild things: the weirdest facts from the animal kingdom

Did you know that trout fake orgasms, or that frogs swallow with their eyes? Matt Walker scours the latest zoological research to find the interesting facts

Shell's Technology Enterprise Programme: One big Step for studentkind

Shell's Technology Enterprise Programme offers the best-paid holiday jobs ever. By James Morrison

Thomas Sutcliffe: This time at least, listen to the critics

I overheard a woman on her mobile this morning, updating a friend about her weekend. "We went to see The Da Vinci Code," she said. There was a brief pause - just long enough to accommodate the words "What was it like?" - before she delivered the verdict: "Not good ... not good." Well, we bloody told you so, I thought - feeling a momentary spasm of professional critical solidarity. This is not a sentiment that troubles me very often but I couldn't help it in this case.

News
The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
people
Life and Style
tech

Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

Sport
football West Brom vs Man Utd match report: Blind grabs point, but away form a problem for Van Gaal
Arts and Entertainment
Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
tvGotham, episode 2, review
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
tvMira Sorvino on leaving movie roles for 'The Intruders'
News
First woman: Valentina Tereshkova
peopleNASA guinea pig Kate Greene thinks it might fly
News
Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
news

Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
films

George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

Voices
Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
voices

Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Vietnam & Cambodia
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Bruges
India & Nepal
Japan
Berlin, Dresden, Meissen & Colditz
Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
Hugh Bonneville & Peter James: 'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'

How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's heavenly crab dishes don't need hours of preparation

Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

Scared off by the strain of shelling a crab? Let a fishmonger do the hard work so you can focus on getting the flavours right
Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past