Sport Referee Howard Webb has been selected to officiate at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Webb took charge of the 2010 final, becoming the first Englishman to referee a World Cup final since Jack Taylor in 1974

Last Night's TV: She knew how to make a dramatic exit

The Last Word Monologues, BBC1; Comedy Lab: Headwreckers, Channel 4; Masterchef: The professionals, BBC2

Album: Mahler, Symphony No 5 – Tonhalle Orchestra (RCA Red Seal)

David Zinman's Mahler cycle with the Tonhalle Orchestra is shaping up to be one of the most consistent cycles.

You think you're on safe ground but then subsidence strikes

Wet summers aren't all they're cracked up to be when insurance claims still roll in. Chris Menon surveys the danger signs and sees how to go about fixing the fault lines

Euro 2008 in brief: Henry and Ribéry forced to cut short first training session

Thierry Henry and Franck Ribéry pulled out of France's first training session at their Euro 2008 Swiss base after half an hour on yesterday. Ribéry, who was seen holding his right ankle, received a knock in France's 1-0 win over Colombia in their final warm-up on Tuesday in Paris, a team spokesman said. Henry left the training session to undergo treatment, the spokesman said without elaborating. France captain Patrick Vieira, who will miss his side's opening Group C game against Romania on Monday in Zurich, was back in training for the first time since sustaining a left thigh injury last Friday in training and is more hopeful of keeping his place in the squad.

You write the reviews: Ben Johnson's Liverpool Cityscape 2008 and the World Panorama Series, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

I'm no lover of art, so Ben Johnson's Liverpool Cityscape 2008 and the World Panorama Series exhibition came a distant second to the public lectures featuring Richard Dawkins and Patrick Cockburn in my European Capital of Culture programme. How wrong I was.

Zurich Opera/Strauss Der Rosenkavalier, Royal Festival Hall, London

You can take the boy out of Austria but you can't take Austria out of the boy. Franz Welser-Most has always been a very contained conductor – precise, rhythmic, unfussy – but release him into this entrancing world of a bygone Vienna that even Strauss and his librettist Hugo von Hofmannsthal could only imagine and the instincts of his heritage unconsciously come into play.

Firms sceptical over financial advice plan

The financial services industry gave a lukewarm reception to the Government's proposals to develop a new generic financial advice service yesterday, expressing scepticism over its plans to force insurers and banks to help fund the scheme.

Art worth £80m snatched in daring Zurich gallery raid

Robbers wearing ski masks and brandishing pistols stole Impressionist masterpieces by Cezanne, Monet, Degas and Van Gogh worth more than £80m from a Zurich museum in one of the most spectacular art thefts in Europe for decades, police have said.

Will Self: PsychoGeography - The people's Joyce

Consider the final days of James Joyce – I have. Fleeing from Paris in the dying days of 1939, the Joyces headed south to the village of Saint-Gérand-le-Puy, near Vichy. Here, as the Second World War girded up its annihilating loins, the great confabulator was gripped by stomach pain in his rooms at the Hôtel de la Paix, and harried by dogs if he ventured out with his dark glasses on and with his blind man's cane. When asked why he hated them so much, Joyce replied: "Because they have no souls."

How to get permission to destroy the countryside: say you're building an eco-town

A giant Swiss-based insurance company is seeking permission to build a new town of 12,500 houses in Hampshire by labelling it an "eco-town". If it succeeds, Zurich Financial Services – the sixth biggest insurance group in the world, with annual profits of $4.65bn (£2.4bn) – will be looking at a billion-pound bonanza.

Wild things: the weirdest facts from the animal kingdom

Did you know that trout fake orgasms, or that frogs swallow with their eyes? Matt Walker scours the latest zoological research to find the interesting facts

Shell's Technology Enterprise Programme: One big Step for studentkind

Shell's Technology Enterprise Programme offers the best-paid holiday jobs ever. By James Morrison

Thomas Sutcliffe: This time at least, listen to the critics

I overheard a woman on her mobile this morning, updating a friend about her weekend. "We went to see The Da Vinci Code," she said. There was a brief pause - just long enough to accommodate the words "What was it like?" - before she delivered the verdict: "Not good ... not good." Well, we bloody told you so, I thought - feeling a momentary spasm of professional critical solidarity. This is not a sentiment that troubles me very often but I couldn't help it in this case.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape