The ultimate packing list for tech-loving travellers

 

What technology should you pack when you travel? First, you need something to put everything in. A case such as the Rimowa Salsa Air (from £353; rimowa.com) is ideal. It's stylish and super-lightweight, with a built-in TSA lock that allows US Customs to open your bag and inspect it without busting it. The case is capacious (35 litres for the cabin size), strong and has quiet, butter-smooth wheels.

There's also plenty of room inside for tech treats, like an ereader. Best is the Amazon Kindle Paperwhite (from £109; amazon.co.uk) which has the highest-contrast e-ink screen so you can read it in bright sunlight.

You'll need a camera, and if you're clumsy, a waterproof and ruggedised snapper is ideal. The Sony DSC-TX20 (£289; sony.co.uk), which has a 16-megapixel sensor and is slim and stylish, shoots panoramas, 3D images and video as well as regular shots.

There are plenty of mobile phones that take great photos, too. Outstanding is the Nokia Lumia 920, which has a sensor that allows longer exposures. The Lumia is also great on a ski holiday because you can use its touchscreen even with gloves on. Even better, the mapping app allows you to use the phone as a full sat-nav without the cost of roaming charges, because you download free maps in advance and turn roaming off. It’s available from ee.co.uk. The phone costs £19.99 on a £46-per-month two-year contract.

If you take your phone in the car, it's likely to slide all over the place. However, plonk it on a Grippy Pad (£6.99; firebox.com), and it stays put.

You'll need to keep your phone topped up. The Innergie PocketCell phone charger is small, light and has a cable which attaches to most smartphones (£59.99; amazon.co.uk).

If you have a laptop as well as your smartphone or tablet, you may find your hotel will charge you to connect each one to Wi-Fi. Avoid this with the TP-Link Wireles-N Nano router, a gadget that can share a single Wi-Fi signal with multiple devices while you pay for just one connection (£16.79 from amazon.co.uk).

And if you don't want being abroad to impact on your exercise regime, the Fitbit One is a minuscule clip-on monitor that counts your every step. You can also use it as an alarm clock – attach it to your wrist where it will vibrate you into consciousness (£79.99; fitbit.com).

Finally, it's easy to leave your phone behind on the restaurant table or shop counter if you're in unfamiliar circumstances. The Zomm Wireless Leash attaches to your key ring and monitors your phone's whereabouts wirelessly. Walk too far from it and an alarm sounds (£24.99 from amazon.co.uk).

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