Barack Obama: Silence over the true cost of doing nothing about US healthcare

The history is clear – every time we come close to passing health insurance reform, the special interests with a stake in the status quo use their influence and political allies to scare and mislead the American people.

As an example, let's look at one of the scarier-sounding and more ridiculous rumors out there – that so-called "death panels" would decide whether senior citizens get to live or die. That rumour began with the distortion of one idea in a Congressional bill that would allow Medicare to cover voluntary visits with your doctor to discuss your end-of-life care – if and only if you decide to have those visits. It had nothing to do with putting government in control of your decisions; in fact, it would give you all the information you need – if you want it – to put you in control.

So when folks with a stake in the status quo keep inventing these boogeymen in an effort to scare people, it's disappointing, but it's not surprising. We've seen it before. When President Roosevelt was working to create Social Security, opponents warned it would open the door to "federal snooping" and force Americans to wear dog tags. When President Kennedy and President Johnson were working to create Medicare, opponents warned of "socialised medicine". Sound familiar? Not only were those fears never realised, but more importantly, those programmes have saved the lives of tens of millions of seniors, the disabled, and the disadvantaged.

Those who would stand in the way of reform will say almost anything to scare you about the cost of action. But they won't say much about the cost of inaction. If you're worried about rationed care, higher costs, denied coverage, or bureaucrats getting between you and your doctor, then you should know that's what's happening right now. In the past three years, over 12 million Americans were discriminated against by insurance companies due to a pre-existing condition, or saw their coverage denied or dropped just when they got sick and needed it most. Americans whose jobs and healthcare are secure today just don't know if they'll be next to join the 14,000 who lose their health insurance every single day. And if we don't act, average family premiums will keep rising to more than $22,000 within a decade.

Taken from the US President's weekly address to the country