Sophie Heawood: Boring! Capturing yourself in the act is too normal and too easy

Tulisa Contostavlos has broken the mould - she does not need to sell sex to get to the top

Share

Some friends of mine, a couple, once stayed at my flat for a few weeks while they waited for their wedding and their new house to be sorted out. One day the woman went out, leaving her laptop open on the kitchen table. Her screensaver was a slideshow of all her photos, and so, as I pottered around the flat, I kept glancing at her holiday snaps whizzing past. Along with a shot of her eyes boggling over her future husband's member, which was rammed in her mouth at the time.

That happy sight floated back into my mind this week when popstar and TV presenter Tulisa Contostavlos won a High Court verdict against her ex-boyfriend Justin Edwards, who had released a private video of them and sold it online. He denied releasing the sex tape, suggesting it came from Tulisa herself.

She was soon accused of trying to boost her career, not to mention being a slag. Into every celebrity's life, a little kiss 'n' tell must fall. But Tulisa wasn't taking this one lying down – well, not again.

Against the advice of her managers and publicists, she took to the internet to declare otherwise. She gave interviews to declare otherwise. And then, she went to the High Court to declare otherwise, and won. He confessed. She paid her lawyers and went on holiday to Ibiza to celebrating her victory and turning 24. It's nothing short of extraordinary.

As is evidenced by my friends, it's pretty normal nowadays to digitally capture yourselves in the act. In fact, it's too normal, and too easy, because it often ends badly for the woman, who doesn't seem to realise that if a bloke can pass this around his friends, he probably will, and it will royally mess things up for her in the end. It shouldn't, but it will.

Tulisa doesn't regret her relationship with that man, she doesn't regret making a sex tape, but she regrets trusting him. And so she's hammered her point home and made quite clear that, unlike Kim Kardashian and Paris Hilton, she worked for a decade on a career before this came out. She's never got her boobs out for men's mags, and there's a world of difference between her dressing up for a pop video and selling sex to get to the top.

Frankly, for a glamorous female celeb in her early twenties – who's a gossip mag staple – she's broken the mould. Selling sex is so boring. Well done.

Twitter: @heawood

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

 

In Sickness and in Health: 'I'm really happy to be alive and to see Rebecca'

Rebecca Armstrong
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine