Leading article: Expose the BNP’s lies and distortions

Share
Related Topics

The unexpected victory of British National Party candidate Paul Golding in a Sevenoaks by-election is the first council seat won by the party outside London and south of the Thames. Widespread anger, following the economic downturn and continuing rows about jobs for indigenous workers, have delivered the victory. But, while the BNP has no chance of taking power in Kent, this is no excuse for complacency.

The party’s foothold in the North West of England, where party leader Nick Griffin is standing, grows stronger. There, the BNP requires just a 2 per cent swing in the polls to win a seat in the European Parliament. In that eventuality, the party will gain access to as much as £250,000 in public resources to continue its campaign. To stop this, voters resist any illusion that the BNP could create jobs in Britain. Its twisted worldview would only achieve the reverse, isolating us in Europe while dividing our nation.

A question mark remains, however, over whether our mainstream politicians can communicate this message. So far Gordon Brown has done the reverse. Indeed, his only resonant soundbite – “British jobs for British workers” – is now trumpeted on the BNP website. The Prime Minister should never have used this right-wing dog-whistle phrase. Each repetition gives succour to the BNP’s sinister platform, though it makes little sense in this globalised world. What precisely are “British jobs” in a country where more than 300 of the top 800 companies are foreign owned?

And if this is one example of a communication failure by politicians, there are others. The BNP’s strength comes from a sense of disenchantment felt by many poor, white communities in Britain whose concerns – not least regarding job stability, inflexible council housing lists, and crime – seem to be ignored by a distant Westminster elite that seems to speak a different language.

The tragedy of this is, of course, that while the growing support for the BNP is a manifestation of broad frustration rather than aggressive racism in Britain, every ballot cast for them strains race relations in Britain a little further.

It falls to the media and mainstream politicians to expose their lies and distortions. To send these racists to Europe would shame our nation.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Geography Teacher, Dover School, full time role

Competitive Salary: Randstad Education Group: Randstad Education is urgently s...

Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £30000 per annum + uncapped: SThree: Do you feel your sales role is l...

Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £45000 per annum + uncapped: SThree: Key featuresA highly motivated ...

Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + OTE: SThree: SThree are seeking Trainee Recruitmen...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

Why Facebook won't be feeling threatened by Ello...yet

Ed Rex
 

Letter from the Political Editor: Cameron's unexpected tax pledges give the Tories home advantage

Andrew Grice
Italian couples fake UK divorce scam on an ‘industrial scale’

Welcome to Maidenhead, the divorce capital of... Italy

A look at the the legal tourists who exploited our liberal dissolution rules
Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

The vintage series has often been criticised for racial stereotyping
An app for the amorous: Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?

An app for the amorous

Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?
Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid. Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?

Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid

Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?
Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

After a few early missteps with Chekhov, her acting career has taken her to Hollywood. Next up is a role in the BBC’s gangster drama ‘Peaky Blinders’
She's having a laugh: Britain's female comedians have never had it so good

She's having a laugh

Britain's female comedians have never had it so good, says stand-up Natalie Haynes
Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LED lights designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows

Let there be light

Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LEDs designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows
Great British Bake Off, semi-final, review: Richard remains the baker to beat

Tensions rise in Bake Off's pastry week

Richard remains the baker to beat as Chetna begins to flake
Paris Fashion Week, spring/summer 2015: Time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris

A look to the future

It's time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris
The 10 best bedspreads

The 10 best bedspreads

Before you up the tog count on your duvet, add an extra layer and a room-changing piece to your bed this autumn
Arsenal vs Galatasaray: Five things we learnt from the Emirates

Arsenal vs Galatasaray

Five things we learnt from the Gunners' Champions League victory at the Emirates
Stuart Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

This deal gives England a head-start to prepare for 2019 World Cup, says Chris Hewett
Ebola outbreak: The children orphaned by the virus – then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection

The children orphaned by Ebola...

... then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection
Pride: Are censors pandering to homophobia?

Are censors pandering to homophobia?

US film censors have ruled 'Pride' unfit for under-16s, though it contains no sex or violence
The magic of roundabouts

Lords of the rings

Just who are the Roundabout Appreciation Society?