Letter: Kipling, innit

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The Independent Online
Kipling, innit

Sir: Kipling, writing in 1909, has "ain't it" used just as "innit" reportedly is used by today's youngsters ("Youth English goes Creole", 17 May). In "The House Surgeon" (Actions and Reactions) one character continually uses it in just this curious way: "You might be immune, ain't it?" he says; and "a man ought to be happy after so much expense, ain't it?" The speaker is presented as an ordinary UK inhabitant called L Maxwell M'Leod.

PETER W THORPE

Portsmouth

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