Letter: Legacy of the baby-boomers

I WAS interested to read Laurie Taylor's article "Still behaving badly? The baby-boomers who refuse to go quietly" (14 November). It's heartwarming to hear that many 50-year-olds are still enjoying good health and a lively social life. Certainly they work hard to earn their rewards. It is certain, too, that they don't accept as readily as previous generations did the perceived wisdom of their elders. In many ways their attitudes are far more flexible than the older generation's; they have had to become more tolerant than previous generations, and face different problems.

However, I wonder what their legacy will be to their children and grandchildren? Spiritual values that have formed the backbone of our society are derided in favour of a philosophy of pragmatism. Without any accepted value system, how can we survive the onslaught of the drink, drugs and rock 'n' roll culture to which our children are subjected?

The baby-boomers have learnt "the tricks of the trade", says Mr Taylor. Big deal! Just so they can complain articulately when things don't suit, and call it "fighting for my rights"? What happened to taking responsibility for the rights of others? If all they can think of to do with their advantages is to take three holidays a year and go to parties to shovel ice down their trousers, what is the point of all that education?


Worsley, Manchester