IoS letters, emails & online postings (26 September 2010)

Share
Related Topics

Your columnist Joanna Moorhead is right ("Benedict bites back", 19 September): the Vatican is a very slick operation, but no mention was made of the number of highly qualified women who work within the Vatican itself, curating a massive collection of treasures from round the world which reflect the missionary element of the faith over centuries, and caring for the collections of books and manuscripts with corridor after corridor of history deep underground. What always mystifies me is why the celibacy rule is so deeply rooted within church dogma when the central plank of it is that the Pope is the direct descendant by acknowledged Faith of Peter the Apostle. The Basilica is built over what is considered to be his tomb, complete with bones. Peter was a married man. There is reference to his mother-in-law within scripture.

Judith Toms

Trecynon, Aberdare

Andy Atkins from Friends of the Earth describes environmental sustainability as "the forgotten goal" ("World fails to deliver on eight key targets: Missing the Millennium Development Goals", 19 September). But I believe the eighth goal, more than the seventh, deserves this description. Of particular importance is target 15: to "deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries through national and international measures in order to make debt sustainable in the long term". It is farcical for developed countries to aid developing countries when the IMF, World Bank and similar bodies remain unreformed, controlled by the richest countries for their own benefit. Money continues to be loaned to countries that already have an unsustainable burden of debt. Recent "aid" – loans of $3bn to Pakistan from the World Bank and Asian Development Fund – increased the country's debt to $49bn. International economic bodies need to write off all previous loans of dubious legality and give future aid solely as grants, while the system needs extensive reform. The Millennium Development Goals will never be more than a token unless goal eight receives serious attention.

Toby Hobbs

Results UK, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

John Rentoul misses the main points about the coalition which won't go away ("Nick Clegg could yet be proved right", 19 September). The Liberal Democrats have broken faith with their own voters. It is entirely immoral to make the poorest pay the gambling debts of the bankers. The cuts won't work anyway because (a) it's a fantasy that the private sector is busting a gut to take up the slack left by a receding public sector; (b) export-led growth isn't happening; (c) a massive increase in unemployment will cause less tax and national insurance to be paid and reduce domestic demand so government revenues will fall and less debt can be paid; (d) increased family breakdown and crime will add to costs.

Bill Haymes

Coventry

Your picture of the Deputy PM and Simon Hughes (19 September) arriving at the Liberal Democrat conference tells a story. Mr Clegg is attempting to button his jacket, while Hughes is pulling up his trousers. It appears the coalition is causing them no angst so far based on that appearance.

Keith Flett

London, N17

David Randall takes to task the thoughtless celebrity parents who burden their children with toe-curling names ("Meet Jamie's son...", 19 September). However, I feel I ought to come to the defence of Sting, who was on the list of villains for the crime of lumbering his daughter with the label Fuchsia. Sting played Steerpike in the 1984 BBC Radio 4 adaptation of the first two books of Mervyn Peake's darkly Gothic Gormenghast trilogy. Being a Peake enthusiast, Sting seems to have named his daughter after the books' imaginative, passionate, but ultimately tragic Fuchsia, Lord Sepulchrave's daughter. An "infantilising, equality-sapping fluffy pink confection" would have been far from his intention when he was choosing a name for his child.

Julie Sinclair

Verwood, Dorset

Dan Plesch is right ("Let's clear away the Trident delusion", 19 September). We are told "we need our independent nuclear deterrent". It is not ours because the British public does not want it; it is not independent because it is dependent on American missiles, weapons and guidance systems; it is not a deterrent because it does not deter any real threat with which we are faced.

Greenpeace estimates Trident will cost £97m, or £2,400 per death. Are there no cheaper ways of killing people on a genocidal scale?

Jim McCluskey

Author, The Nuclear Threat,

Twickenham, Middlesex

D J Taylor mentions a Gaga in Punch in 1929 ("Lady Gaga and the TUC prove there's nowt new under t'sun", 19 September). But an earlier appearance is in Emile Zola's 1880 novel Nana, a meat-market novel of theatres, showgirls and prostitution. "Don't you know Gaga?... She was the darling of the early [18]30s."

Jonathan Tyler

Peterborough, Cambridgeshire

Have your say

Letters to the Editor, Independent on Sunday, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5HF; email: sundayletters@independent.co.uk (with address; no attachments, please); fax: 020 7005 2627; online: independent.co.uk/dayinapage/2010/September/26

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Senior Risk Manager - Banking - London - £650

£600 - £650 per day: Orgtel: Conduct Risk Liaison Manager - Banking - London -...

Commercial Litigation Associate

Highly Attractive Package: Austen Lloyd: CITY - COMMERCIAL LITIGATION - GLOBAL...

Systems Manager - Dynamics AX

£65000 - £75000 per annum + Benefits: Progressive Recruitment: The client is a...

Service Delivery Manager (Software Development, Testing)

£40000 - £45000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A well-established software house ba...

Day In a Page

Read Next
The economy expanded by 0.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2014  

British economy: Government hails the latest GDP figures, but there is still room for skepticism over this 'glorious recovery'

Ben Chu
Comedy queen: Miranda Hart has said that she is excited about working on the new film  

There is no such thing as a middle-class laugh

David Lister
Backhanders, bribery and abuses of power have soared in China as economy surges

Bribery and abuses of power soar in China

The bribery is fuelled by the surge in China's economy but the rules of corruption are subtle and unspoken, finds Evan Osnos, as he learns the dark arts from a master
Commonwealth Games 2014: Highland terriers stole the show at the opening ceremony

Highland terriers steal the show at opening ceremony

Gillian Orr explores why a dog loved by film stars and presidents is finally having its day
German art world rocked as artists use renowned fat sculpture to distil schnapps

Brewing the fat from artwork angers widow of sculptor

Part of Joseph Beuys' 1982 sculpture 'Fettecke' used to distil schnapps
BBC's The Secret History of Our Streets reveals a fascinating window into Britain's past

BBC takes viewers back down memory lane

The Secret History of Our Streets, which returns with three films looking at Scottish streets, is the inverse of Benefits Street - delivering warmth instead of cynicism
Joe, film review: Nicolas Cage delivers an astonishing performance in low budget drama

Nicolas Cage shines in low-budget drama Joe

Cage plays an ex-con in David Gordon Green's independent drama, which has been adapted from a novel by Larry Brown
How to make your own gourmet ice lollies, granitas, slushy cocktails and frozen yoghurt

Make your own ice lollies and frozen yoghurt

Think outside the cool box for this summer's tempting frozen treats
Ford Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time, with sales topping 4.1 million since 1976

Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time

Sales have topped 4.1 million since 1976. To celebrate this milestone, four Independent writers recall their Fiestas with pride
10 best reed diffusers

Heaven scent: 10 best reed diffusers

Keep your rooms smelling summery and fresh with one of these subtle but distinctive home fragrances that’ll last you months
Commonwealth Games 2014: Female boxers set to compete for first time

Female boxers set to compete at Commonwealth Games for first time

There’s no favourites and with no headguards anything could happen
Five things we’ve learned so far about Manchester United under Louis van Gaal

Five things we’ve learned so far about United under Van Gaal

It’s impossible to avoid the impression that the Dutch manager is playing to the gallery a little
Screwing your way to the top? Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth

Screwing your way to the top?

Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, says Grace Dent
Will the young Britons fighting in Syria be allowed to return home and resume their lives?

Will Britons fighting in Syria be able to resume their lives?

Tony Blair's Terrorism Act 2006 has made it an offence to take part in military action abroad with a "political, ideological, religious or racial motive"
Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter, the wartime poster girl who became a feminist pin-up

Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter

The wartime poster girl became the ultimate American symbol of female empowerment
The quest to find the perfect pair of earphones: Are custom, 3D printed earbuds the solution?

The quest to find the perfect pair of earphones

Earphones don't fit properly, offer mediocre audio quality and can even be painful. So the quest to design the perfect pair is music to Seth Stevenson's ears
US Army's shooting star: Lt-Col Steven Cole is the man Hollywood calls when it wants to borrow a tank or check a military uniform

Meet the US Army's shooting star

Lt-Col Steven Cole is the man Hollywood calls when it wants to borrow a tank or check a military uniform