IoS letters, emails & online postings (3 April 2011)

Share
Related Topics

Having spent much of Saturday 26 March watching some 500,000 peaceful demonstrators go by my window in Piccadilly while a handful acted violently, I was dismayed by much of the news coverage, and commentary of the violent few and not of the larger public discontent.
The Independent on Sunday was the exception among British newspapers. Your leader, "A march for fairness", was one of the few that viewed with perspective what is being done to Britain by the current Tory/Lib Dem coalition. I find it odd that my country and the brave British forces are fighting for those most despised and oppressed in Libya at great cost, while the UK Government and US Republicans are fighting our young, the old, the sick, our poor, and undoing our joint future.

Harry C Blaney III

Senior fellow, Center for International Policy

Washington DC, USA

Under an apocalyptic front-page photo of riot police you asked, "Should we allow the violence of a tiny minority to detract from Britain's biggest demonstration in eight years?" The photographs that you published answered your question: four more showing acts of violence and only one depicting the half a million people demonstrating peacefully.

Mike Western

Ipswich, Suffolk

I was disappointed to read allegations that our decision to seek to opt-in to the EU directive on human trafficking was "shuffled out" ("UK signs trafficking directive after 10-month delay", 27 March). We always said we would make a decision on applying to opt in to this directive when a final text was agreed. This is what we have done, and we have asked Parliament to scrutinise our decision. The UK Human Trafficking Centre already works with law enforcement agencies providing valuable tactical advice, intelligence analysis and expertise in anti-trafficking operations 24/7. In the spring, we will publish a new trafficking strategy with a greater focus on enforcement and improved support for victims.

Damian Green

Home Office minister

House of Commons

London WC1

Elizabeth Taylor belongs to the generation of film stars created by the studio system ("The eclipse of stardom", 27 March). In that era, an actor's life and career were carefully groomed, creating the effect that she lived in a remote, rarefied realm. While the system was flawed, it also produced Hollywood personalities who captured the global imagination. Today, celebrity sex tapes, public meltdowns and reality shows have cheapened stardom and democratised fame. It is impossible for today's movie actors to have Taylor's mystique.

Derek Czajkowski

Nizwa, Oman

Standing in the wings waiting to go on for Imelda Staunton and Mathew Horne in Entertaining Mr Sloane, my fellow actor and I heard the announcement saying that they were indisposed and we were taking their place ("A crisis on stage...", 27 March). We were not thrilled to hear the chorus of booing from the audience. Understudies have about 10 per cent of the rehearsal time allotted to the "real" cast, but are still expected to turn in a more than adequate performance in. I've been in audiences when understudies have been announced, and if it was someone I'd particularly wanted to see, I've been disappointed. But I've also seen some astonishing performances which may have surpassed the originals.

Sharon Eckman

Hitchin, Hertfordshire

With universities soon to be increasing their fees, and some charging the maximum, should we be asking for them to be accountable? During recent lecturer strikes over pensions, many students have lost lectures and seminars, some being refused a replacement. The universities will have a reduced salary bill while the strikes are on, but seminars are not replaced, nor support offered to those students disadvantaged in comparison with students on the same course who had their seminar or lecture just because the strike did not fall on that day. Hard-working students and parents struggling to pay their fees need this issue to be addressed by the universities.

Marilyn G Cadman

via email

Stephen Brenkley wrote a perceptive piece about cricketer Michael Yardy's problems with depression ("BBC should still act...", 27 March). Geoffrey Boycott does not like to talk about his state in 1974-1976, when England batsmen Steele, Edrich and Close were battling the extreme pace of Lillee, Thomson and Holding. Though not physically injured, he expected understanding of his reluctance to play. Boycott should show similar understanding of Michael Yardy's decision to return home for India.

Peter Brookes

Wakefield, West Yorkshire

Given that tall people are paid more than short people ("Upper classes really do look down their noses at us", 27 March"), tax rates should be adjusted to compensate the vertically challenged.

Ivor Morgan

via email

Have your say

Letters to the Editor, Independent on Sunday, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5HF; email: sundayletters@independent.co.uk (with address; no attachments, please); fax: 020 7005 2627; online: independent.co.uk/dayinapage/2011/April/3

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Administrative Assistant / Order Fulfilment

£14000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An exciting opportunity to join a thrivi...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped OTE: SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consulta...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped OTE: SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consulta...

Recruitment Genius: Production Operative

£13000 - £17000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Due to a period of sustained an...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

Syria's Kurds have little choice but to flee amid the desolution, ruins and danger they face

Patrick Cockburn
A bartender serves two Mojito cocktails  

For the twenty-somethings of today, growing up is hard to do

Simon Kelner
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there