Children draw MPs' portraits in political art competition

No taxpayers' money has been spent in the creation of these artworks

Children may do the funniest things, but drawing politicians is not usually one of them.

Not in this case, however, as a new competition is encouraging children to create their own versions of MPs' portraits, after it emerged earlier this week British politicians spent £250,000 of public money on self-portraits.

The resulting masterpieces show that a dab of paint for a nose and a crayoned mop of hair can do the job just fine, with no taxpayers' money spared.

MPs splurge £250,000 of public money on 'expensive' portraits

Prime Minister David Cameron, Education Secretary Michael Gove and Mayor of London Boris Johnson have all been immortalised by entrants.

“I wanted to draw that Boris because his face is funny and he can fly!” said 5-year-old Fred, unaware that politicans’ powers fortunately do not extend quite that far.

Demilia, 8, chose to depict Diane Abbott MP because "she reminded her of her pet hamster, Jessie J", while Eve, 5, got a little confused and drew Nelson Mandela, because "he looked happy and was waving". 

Another young artist, 7-year-old Amelia, said to her mother while drawing Cameron: “I wonder how much David would pay for this?”

Sara Maslin, editor of website iChild, which is running the competition, said: “It is a great opportunity for children to learn more about the politicians that govern us. We have worked with schools and childminders for many years now, and we have seen some amazing designs from children.

“We felt therefore that children could provide far more exciting portraits of politicans at a fraction of the price.”

A 2004 painting of MP Diane Abbott which cost £11,750, by Stuart Pearson Wright

Last week it was revealed that £250,000 of public money has been used to fund the ultimate MP vanity project - having specially-commissioned portraits of themselves painted by the UK's leading artists. Iain Duncan Smith, William Hague, Tony Blair and Diane Abbott are among those to have commissioned self-portraits.

The children's competition starts officially on Monday 20 January and will run for two weeks.