David Shrigley’s fine line between art and fun nominated for Turner Prize

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

 

Some people think David Shrigley’s artwork isn’t serious enough to be, well, taken seriously. Yet the artist, noted for the humour that runs through  his comical line drawings, may have the last laugh after being nominated for the Turner Prize.

The 44-year-old was named on the shortlist for the UK’s most prestigious contemporary art award, and its £25,000 bounty, alongside film and installation  artist Laure Prouvost, painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Tino Sehgal, whose “live encounters” have been performed in sites including Tate Modern.

Click here or on "View Images" for a gallery of work by shortlisted artists

Shrigley, who was born in Macclesfield and has been based in Glasgow since studying at the Glasgow School of Art, was nominated for the retrospective of his work at the Hayward Gallery in London. His artwork has won legions of admirers including celebrated musicians and authors, and even inspired obsessive fans to tattoo his sketches on their bodies, yet has been ignored for serious acclaim from the art world.

“He had been wrongly overlooked for a long time because his work suggested itself as being just funny and therefore marginal,” said Penelope Curtis, director of Tate Britain and chair of the jury. “Just because it’s funny, doesn’t mean it’s not good.”

He had been seen as a “wild card,” Ms Curtis said, but his show at the Hayward had “quite considerable impact”. She added: “Really it was a new look at an artist who had been familiar for quite some time.” Shrigley’s exhibition included drawings, sculpture, photography and film. The jury said it revealed “his black humour, macabre intelligence and infinite jest”. Among the stand out works was a stuffed dog holding a sign reading “I’m dead”.

Cliff Lausan, curator of Shrigley’s show at the Hayward, said the nomination was “wonderful news. I’m really pleased for him”. ?He said: “What makes David’s work unique is he’s got one foot in the pop culture world, the way his drawings circulate, and the other in fine art…”

The work has brought him fans including author Dave Eggers, and musicians with whom he has collaborated including Blur and Franz Ferdinand.

Mr Lausan said Shrigley’s appeal stems from his sense of humour. “Every piece of work he does, the drawings, sculptures and collaborations with other artists. His sense of humour cuts right through.”

The 29th Turner Prize will be the first one to be awarded outside of England. The winner will be announced in the converted military barracks in Derry as part of the city’s year-long reign as UK City of Culture.  

Turner Prize shortlist 2013:

David Shrigley - The Macclesfield-born Glasgow-based humourist is known for his line drawings but is also a sculptor.

Tate says: "[He is nominated for] his solo exhibition at Hayward Gallery David Shrigley: Brain Activity which offered a comprehensive overview and new perspectives on his work. Including not only his well-loved drawings but also photography, sculpture and film, the exhibition revealed his black humour, macabre intelligence and infinite jest."

Laure Prouvost - The recipient of the 2011 Max Mara art prize for her short films and installation work is from Lille but is based in London.

Tate says: "Her unique approach to filmmaking, often situated within atmospheric installations, employs strong story telling, quick cuts, montage and deliberate misuse of language to create surprising and unpredictable work."

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye - The London-based artist of Ghanaian descent has been shortlisted for her Extracts and Verses Exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery.

Tate says: "Yiadom-Boakye’s intriguing paintings appear traditional but are in fact much more innovative. Her portraits of imaginary people use invented pre-histories and raise pertinent questions about how we read pictures in general, particularly with regard to black subjects."

Tino Sehgal - The British-German artist makes "constructed situations" and is nominated for the "live installation" he staged at the Tate Modern's Turbine Hall last year.

Tate says: "Seghal’s intimate works consist purely of live encounters between people and demonstrate a keen sensitivity to their institutional context. Through participatory means, they test the limits of artistic material and audience perception in a new and significant way."

Arts and Entertainment

Great British Bake Off
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

    Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

    But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
    Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

    Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

    Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
    Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

    Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

    Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
    Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

    Britain's 24-hour culture

    With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
    Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

    The addictive nature of Diplomacy

    Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
    Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

    Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

    Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
    8 best children's clocks

    Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

    Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
    Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

    Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

    After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
    Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

    How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

    Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
    Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

    'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

    In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
    Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

    The Arab Spring reversed

    Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
    King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

    Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

    Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
    Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

    Who is Oliver Bonas?

    It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
    Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

    Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

    However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
    60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

    60 years of Scalextric

    Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones