Boyd Tonkin: Author, thinker – prime minister?

The week in books

Since historians enjoy counter-factual games, let's play one with a literary spin. Imagine that, in 1990, the writer-turned-liberal politician Mario Vargas Llosa had kept his first-round lead into the run-off election and become president of Peru instead of the populist charlatan Alberto Fujimori. Within months, Vargas Llosa, always branded as the out-of-touch patrician, would surely have slipped into hot and deep water over the country's economic gridlock and vicious guerrilla insurgency. Besieged by one scandal after another, lacking a base among the masses, the author-president would sooner or later have fallen from power, damaged goods for ever.

So what really happened? Canny, crooked Fujimori outsmarted the high-minded literary gent. Vargas Llosa stormed back to his desk. There followed an exuberant apologia for his campaign, A Fish in the Water, and a succession of novels that switched between the merely good (The Road to Paradise) and the blazingly great (The Feast of the Goat). Last October, he became one of the most widely popular and uncontested Nobel laureates in literature for many years.

I wonder whether Michael Ignatieff has had any time to ponder the Vargas Llosa path. On 2 May, the writer, broadcaster and academic will lead Canada's Liberal Party into a federal election. If he can stitch together the expected post-election coalition, he could well emerge from it as prime minister. Yet Ignatieff is no scholar-statesman in the old Gladstonian mould, twin-tracking the study and the hustings over long decades. Neither does he belong in the Vaclav Havel camp: an artist-activist closely bound up with a national movement for change.

No: the historian, philosopher, novelist, BBC2 and Channel 4 presenter, Cambridge research fellow and Harvard professor only took up full-time politics five years ago. In 2006, he won election as MP for a Toronto lakeside constituency. Pre-selected as a star turn by Liberal grandees, who lured him back to Canada, Ignatieff rose at rocket speed to gain the leadership of his party in 2009. If the Liberals do head the next government in Ottawa, a leading developed nation will have as its premier a Booker Prize-shortlisted front-man for The Late Show who once lived on Chapel Market in Islington. Not too many people know that.

Ignatieff is no hack who barged into the limelight when the writing and teaching racket began to pall. Quite a few books from his eclectic 17-volume shelf belong to the first rank in their fields. I admire his fiction, especially Asya and Scar Tissue (the Booker contender in 1993). The history of prisons, A Just Measure of Pain; the memoir of a Tsarist family in exile, The Russian Album; the treatise on togetherness in an atomised society, The Needs of Strangers; the biography of Isaiah Berlin, and later studies of human rights, ethnic conflict and military intervention such as The Warrior's Honour: all earned their plaudits. Yet in today's rough politics such a glittering cv tarnishes fast. Enemies routinely label him as an airy-fairy egghead of dubious loyalty. And his stiff-limbed campaigning style will need to loosen up pretty soon.

A cynic might propose that a gold-plated record as author and intellectual will do nothing to boost a political career, although it might give rise to a classier kind of memoir after the fall. Of course we have no objective reason to believe that a former professor will make a finer servant of the public than a former postman (such as the estimable Alan Johnson). Many voters might suspect exactly the opposite. Still, I'm encouraged by the frequency with which Ignatieff (wearing other hats) has dwelled on just those issues of dignity, respect and equality that divide people in democracies. Thinkers in politics often come to grief. But then so do lawyers, bankers and journalists. At the very least, anyone of Ignatieff's pedigree who attains power should grasp the value of investment in education at all levels; in culture, science and research.

It may never happen. The polls look flaky. For all his TV studio experience, the Liberal leader fails to radiate charisma to most Canadians. He could well share Vargas Llosa's nearly-man fate. If so, he should quit at once and rush back to the keyboard. What would persuade readers abroad to tackle a first-person account of Canadian politics? Perhaps only Ignatieff's name on the cover.

Farewell to a mistress of magic

As the Harry Potter cult swept the planet, many children's authors who had enlisted magical themes were cited as possible forerunners or inspirations. Although this source-hunting soon got pretty silly, it did have one positive outcome. Many young (and not so young) readers rediscovered the fabulous Chrestomanci series by Diana Wynne Jones, creator of the suave sorceror in 1977. She died at the weekend after a richly inventive career that left a legacy of 40-plus books. Among its other highlights, the incomparable Howl's Moving Castle (above) became a bewitching animated film directed by Hayao Miyazaki for Studio Ghibli in Japan.

Saying no to prizes, and Gaddafi

Ever the dark horse, John le Carré has said that he wishes to have his name removed from the final list of 13 writers under discussion to follow Ismail Kadare, Chinua Achebe and Alice Munro as winner of the £60,000 Man Booker International Prize. The judges will clearly not select him, but refuse to strike his name down - a little like the way HMS Victory still appears on the Royal Navy rolls. This is all suitably murky. Le Carré has said that "I do not compete for literary prizes". So presumably the "John le Carré" who won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1964 for The Spy Who Came In From The Cold was someone else entirely? No matter: the dozen writers left – from Amin Maalouf to Philip Roth, Marilynne Robinson to Philip Pullman - shine just as brightly. I'll be carrying a flag for another contender, the veteran Spanish maverick Juan Goytisolo. In 2009, this lifelong friend of the Arab world refused a lucrative Gaddafi-sponsored prize in Libya. Maybe he has some time free to give the LSE lessons in integrity.

b.tonkin@independent.co.uk

PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Judd Apatow’s make-it-up-as-you-go-along approach is ideal for comedies about stoners and slackers slouching towards adulthood
filmWith comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
Arts and Entertainment
booksForget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Off set: Bab El Hara
tvTV series are being filmed outside the country, but the influence of the regime is still being felt
Arts and Entertainment
Red Bastard: Where self-realisation is delivered through monstrous clowning and audience interaction
comedy
Arts and Entertainment
O'Shaughnessy pictured at the Unicorn Theatre in London
tvFiona O'Shaughnessy explains where she ends and her strange and wonderful character begins
Arts and Entertainment
The new characters were announced yesterday at San Diego Comic Con

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Rhino Doodle by Jim Carter (Downton Abbey)

TV
Arts and Entertainment
No Devotion's Geoff Rickly and Stuart Richardson
musicReview: No Devotion, O2 Academy Islington, London
Arts and Entertainment
Christian Grey cradles Ana in the Fifty Shades of Grey film

film
Arts and Entertainment
Comedian 'Weird Al' Yankovic

Is the comedy album making a comeback?

comedy
Arts and Entertainment
While many films were released, few managed to match the success of James Bond blockbuster 'Skyfall'
film
Arts and Entertainment
Jamie Dornan as Christian Grey in the first-look Fifty Shades of Grey movie still

film
Arts and Entertainment
Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, centre, are up for Best Female TV Comic for their presenting quips on The Great British Bake Off

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in the TV adaptation of 'Fargo'

TV
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from Shakespeare in Love at the Noel Coward Theatre
theatreReview: Shakespeare in Love has moments of sheer stage poetry mixed with effervescent fun
Arts and Entertainment
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson stars in Hercules

film
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'

film
Arts and Entertainment
<p><strong>2008</strong></p>
<p>Troubled actor Robert Downey Jr cements his comeback from drug problems by bagging the lead role in Iron Man. Two further films follow</p>

film
Arts and Entertainment

theatre
Arts and Entertainment
Tycoons' text: Warren Buffett and Bill Gates both cite John Brookes' 'Business Adventures' as their favourite book

books
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

    A new Russian revolution

    Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
    Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
    Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

    Standing my ground

    If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
    Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
    Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

    Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

    The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
    The man who dared to go on holiday

    The man who dared to go on holiday

    New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

    For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
    The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

    The Guest List 2014

    Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
    Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

    Jokes on Hollywood

    With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
    It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

    It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

    Voted for by the British public, the artworks on Art Everywhere posters may be the only place where they can be seen
    Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

    Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

    Blanche Marvin reveals how Tennessee Williams used her name and an off-the-cuff remark to create an iconic character
    Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

    Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

    Websites offering your ebooks for nothing is only the latest disrespect the modern writer is subjected to, says DJ Taylor
    Edinburgh Fringe 2014: The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee

    Edinburgh Fringe 2014

    The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee
    Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

    Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

    The woman stepping down as chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund is worried