Album: David Holmes et al

Ocean's Twelve, WARNER BROS
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The Independent Culture

Like its predecessor, this soundtrack mingles together David Holmes' original incidental music with a selection of older tracks intended to impart some local flavour - except that rather than period classics evocative of the Playboy-swinger style of Ocean's Eleven, the follow-up film's European settings are reflected in tracks such as Ornella Vanoni's ballad "L'Appuntamento", and several pieces such as Roland Vincent's "LSD Partie" and Piero Umiliani's "Crepusculo Sul Mare" that have the cheesy, utilitarian feel of Seventies library music, or European soundtrack scores from that era, which is doubtless the intention. Certainly, they fit right in alongside Holmes' own instrumentals, which are like a jazz-funk take on 007 atmospheres, with cool, sleek swells of flutes and horns over low-key guitar vamps, double bass, funk drums, fuzz guitar and zithery textures. It'll doubtless all fall seamlessly into place in the movie, but until then there's plenty to enjoy in things like the stealthy,

Like its predecessor, this soundtrack mingles together David Holmes' original incidental music with a selection of older tracks intended to impart some local flavour - except that rather than period classics evocative of the Playboy-swinger style of Ocean's Eleven, the follow-up film's European settings are reflected in tracks such as Ornella Vanoni's ballad "L'Appuntamento", and several pieces such as Roland Vincent's "LSD Partie" and Piero Umiliani's "Crepusculo Sul Mare" that have the cheesy, utilitarian feel of Seventies library music, or European soundtrack scores from that era, which is doubtless the intention. Certainly, they fit right in alongside Holmes' own instrumentals, which are like a jazz-funk take on 007 atmospheres, with cool, sleek swells of flutes and horns over low-key guitar vamps, double bass, funk drums, fuzz guitar and zithery textures. It'll doubtless all fall seamlessly into place in the movie, but until then there's plenty to enjoy in things like the stealthy, underhand groove of "Le Renard de Nuit" and the seedy organ and rude horns of "The Round up"; while Holmes' own soul-boy affiliations surface clearly in "7/ 29/ 04 The Day of" and "Yen on a Carousel".

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