Lush, Roundhouse, gig review: Reformed band still have 'power to thrill and inspire'

Lush have reformed for their first shows in 20 years, following in the footsteps of 90s indie bands My Bloody Valentine, Slowdive, Ride and Swervedriver

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The Independent Culture

A month after Lush’s first show in almost 20 years and there is a palpable sense of excitement amongst fans. Following the likes of My Bloody Valentine, Slowdive, Ride, Loop and Swervedriver, Lush join the ranks of 90's indie shoegaze act reunions. In tonight's show, the band play their indie hits with confidence and precision; it’s as if time had never passed.

Singer guitarist Miki Berenyi’s hair has changed of course - once a shock of pink, it is now a sedate black while ex-Elastica drummer Justin Welch takes over Chris Acland's role, whose tragic suicide prompted Lush to split back in 1996. 

Musically the band pick up from where they left off: "De Luxe" and "Hypocrite" show tenacious 12-string guitar playing from Berenyi, while Emma Anderson's crisp and focused guitar lines seem to enhance the lushness of Lush on "Undertow" and "Lit Up".

New song "Out Of Control" from this year's Blind Spot EP fits comfortably in tonight's set and proves that their formula - creating quality off-kilter pop songs with high-pitch harmonies and undulating guitar haze - still works. 

"Desire Lines" from Split, is a succinct representation of the young female experience in an overwhelmingly male dominated world of alt-rock, while a particularly tantalising performance of "Ladykillers" is the only song we get from Lovelife. 

Following an emotional "Leave Me Cold", Lush ends with an encore of “Monochrome”, dedicated to Chris Acland. 

Who knows how long Lush's return will last, but, right now, this underrated band prove that they still have the power to thrill and inspire.  

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