Oasis, Glastonbury Festival

Supersonic return of the rock'n'roll star
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The Independent Culture

It could only be Liam - hands clasped behind the back, a slight give in the knees, twisted to his left and gazing up at around 45 degrees at the faces of the adoring tens of thousands before him.

It could only be Liam - hands clasped behind the back, a slight give in the knees, twisted to his left and gazing up at around 45 degrees at the faces of the adoring tens of thousands before him.

Decked out in a fur-hooded white coat, he looked more suited to an Arctic expedition than a trip to a Somerset farm, warmed by a long day of glorious June sunshine.

But this was an expedition of sorts. A reconquering of ground that Oasis had last taken by storm a decade before. Hours before the Gallagher brothers took to the stage, the festival goers had been staking out their vantage points around the Pyramid Stage.

By the time Oasis stormed on to stage, 10 minutes before 11, the darkness was already lit up by thousands of flares and camp fires.

They started off with "Rock 'n' Roll Star" before ripping through "Supersonic'' and "Morning Glory". But the set took off with the dedication of "The next tune to the England football team...".

"All of the stars that faded away...," everyone sang. Before offering the advice, "Stop crying your heart out...".

Only the night before, thousands had gathered around the same stage to watch pictures of England's demise at Euro 2004. For many, last night made up for that.

Noel and Liam were driven on by the drumming of Zak Starkey, son of the former Beatle, Ringo Starr, performing on a stage that is due tonight to host Sir Paul McCartney.

Oasis finished with "Champagne Supernova" before encoring triumphantly with "Wonderwall" to conclude a show that will no doubt enter Glastonbury folklore.

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