The Ten Best Travel Games

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The summer holidays often involve a lot of travelling around with kids - so if you're struggling to keep them busy, our guide to the best travel games could well come in handy

Motormouth - £19.95
Press the button on this gadget and it will come up with a random word which you have to communicate to your team - without saying it. Cue gesticulations, mimes and hilarity.
www.firebox.com; 0844 922 1010

Crap Trumps - £6.95
As the credit crunch bites, it's time to stop promoting unattainable vehicles to youths. Disillusion them with this modern version of Top Trumps and set their sights on a campervan.
www.thingsonline.co.uk; 0208 567 7001

Travel Backgammon - £5.99
The beauty of backgammon is that you don't have to speak to your opponent. This version is magnetic so that you can play it on the move and pause in the middle of a game.
www.itchyfeet.com; 01225 442 618

Travel Connect Four - £6.99
Now Kanye West has admitted to a Connect Four addiction, the classic game has become seriously cool. A portable version is perfect for doing battle on the tour bus - or the train.
www.hamleys.com; 0844 855 2424

20Q Version 2 - £10.99
This little ball of knowledge asks you to think of something - animal, vegetable, mineral - then asks questions to establish what it is. The weird thing is, it's almost always right.
www.amazon.co.uk; 0800 279 6620

Bop It Download - £14.95
The music and high-pitched voice of this rhythm game would used to grate after a hundred turns. No more. This Bop It allows you to download sounds and voices, including your own.
www.iwoot.com; 0844 573 7070

Travel Poker Set - £13.99
Poker has ruined otherwise upstanding people. It has also united families on summer holidays. This version has cards, chips and a carry bag.
www.mailorderexpress.com; 0871 222 1500

Sudokube - £3.99
Whoever realised that a Rubik's cube with numbers was 3D sudoku was a genius. It's more frustrating than the paper version, and very satisfying.
www.presentsformen.co.uk 0870 120 3377

Are We There Yet? - £4.99
I-Spy is a car-journey stalwart, but if guessing "D" for daddy and "R" for road is starting to pall, try this set - packed with colourful cards depicting things to spot, with scores.
www.amazon.co.uk

Twister Beach Towel - £19.95
Who can resist a game that increases your flexibility and results in embarrassing collapsed positions? This version of the excellent Twister appears on a soft beach towel.
www.firebox.com; 0844 922 1010

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