Pope Francis criticises rude people who interrupt others and are obsessed with their phones

'When I am not able to open myself to others, to respect others, to talk to others, to dialogue with others, that is how wars begin'

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Pope Francis appeared to aim a thinly veiled dig at President Trump in a speech delivered to students at Roma Tre University this week, saying that “wars” begin when people aren’t open to others.

He also criticised smartphone use and the conduct of politicians during televised debates. 

The Argentinian pontiff didn’t identify any specific individuals, but his comments follow a number of controversies surrounding Donald Trump, who was involved in one of the most explosive elections in US history and issued an executive order for a travel ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries.

He is also known to be a heavy phone user, with reports claiming he keeps his old handset around to let people chat to him, despite security risks.

“When there’s no dialogue at home, when we’re at the table and instead of talking everyone is on their phone…it’s the start of war, because there is no dialogue,” Pope Francis said.

“Insulting has become normal,” he added. "We need to lower the volume a bit and we need to talk less and listen more. There are many medicines against violence, but above all they come from the heart, knowing how to listen to what the other person thinks. If you think differently from me, let’s talk.”

Mr Trump made a number of false statements at his first solo news conference this week, also using it as an opportunity to mount a sustained attack on the media. 

“When I am not able to open myself to others, to respect others, to talk to others, to dialogue with others, that is how wars begin,” continued Pope Francis, who expressed his frustrations with televised political debates “where even before one [candidate] finishes talking, he is interrupted. Where there is no dialogue, there is violence. 

“Wars start in your heart.”

He spoke out against anti-immigration movements too, saying that immigrants should be welcomed "first of all as human brothers and sisters. They are men and women just like us."

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