Six easy recipes and tips to try during Breakfast Week

Millions of people don't eat breakfast 

Eating breakfast has been linked to maintaining a healthy weight and boosting concentration in the classroom – but millions of us skip it regardless. 

The Breakfast Week campaign is attempting to remind us of the benefits of eating in the morning – be it grabbing something quick on a weekday or slowing savouring a meal on a lazy Sunday. 

The Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board which heads the campaign states that 25 per cent of people skip breakfast once or more a week, while 13 per cent never it. 

However, eating breakfast has been linked to staying avoiding obesity, while a recent study at Cardiff University showed that children who ate breakfast achieved better grades than those who did not.

Below, DW Fitness personal trainer Carly Tierney gives her run down of the worst mistakes to make at breakfast, and six recipe ideas to start the day with. 

Skipping it completely

Either because people don’t make the time to eat it or because they think that missing it will encourage weight loss. This is one of the worst things you can do if you want to lose weight. You will only want to eat more later in the day, and due to hunger levels, you will be vulnerable to making unwise decisions throughout the day.

Thinking that cereal is a healthy option

A great breakfast should include healthy fats, carbohydrates and some protein. Many popular cereals market themselves as healthy when in fact they contain a tonne of sugar.

Slathering toast with butter and jam

Toast is another breakfast staple in Britain, but it’s not necessarily healthy. Wholemeal toast can be good, especially with eggs or a smear of peanut butter. However, many people eat white bread and add butter and jam. A whole load of sugar, saturated fat and unhealthy simple carbs that are a big no-no for weight loss or controlling hunger levels throughout the day.

Drinking orange juice

A lot of people think that it is a good idea to grab a glass of orange juice at breakfast. Yes, it’s packed with vitamins but it’s also packed with calories and sugar. My advice would be to opt for a green tea, sparkling water or coffee and actually eat a piece of fruit, which is much more satisfying.

Relying on breakfast bars

Granola and breakfast bars often serve as quick on-the-go meals, but many of them have as many calories as a dessert. Most commercial cereal bars are basically biscuits in disguise, with a lot more sugar than you need.

Going over the top with your morning coffee

Coffee is great at breakfast but be mindful of the add-ons such as sugar, cream and syrups. Some coffees can contain more calories and fat than a piece of chocolate cake. Think before you drink. A better option would be an Americano, green tea or fruit tea.