In The Red: 'This time I'm definitely selling my flat – I think'

Right. Deep breaths. Here we go: I think I want to sell my flat. I’m not, it has to be said, 100% sure. But I’m fairly certain, so there you go; that’s about as much of a definite statement as you can hope for from a chronically indecisive commitment phobe like me. In fact, this is one of the reasons I want to sell. So that I can rent. So that I’m not tied down. So that I can up and leave at a moment’s (or, at least, a few months’) notice.

I’ve said this all before. I’m perpetually flirting with getting rid of my flat. But this time I mean it. I think. The market is no longer quite as deathly as it was the last time I considered entering it, and my feet are even itchier than they once were. So, estate agents, get in touch. Not you Foxtons, I know your bag. But the rest of you, feel free.

Of course, the prospect of putting a flat up for sale is never an appealing one. For one thing, selling one’s home tends to mean moving. And, as any statistician will tell you, that is one of the most stressful things you can do. For another, selling is going to mean confronting all those DIY jobs I’ve been putting off for months.

Like dealing with my front door. Last year a series of freak accidents – locking myself out, having my handbag stolen, flooding my bathroom and necessitating an emergency break-in – left my front door severely battered. Not actually damaged, from a security point of view, just battered, aesthetically-speaking. I’ll need a new one, which is bound to wrack up a cool three-figure bill. And then there’s the lights that need changing (no “how many writers does it take to change a light bulb” jokes here please. These lights are not ordinary illuminators. Even my father, schooled in the tradition of proper pre-digital-generation DIY is baffled by them). And the walls that need painting. And the shower that needs plumbing. And, of course, there’s the perpetual cleaning that selling one’s home requires to ensure it is permanently buyer-ready. All of which is rather daunting when your life is as time-poor and cash, er, poor as mine.

Hopefully, I’ll recoup the sum I (or, rather, my mortgage-broker) paid for it in the first place. This was, after all, the point of buying in the upwardly-mobile East End of London. But there are the agents fees to consider, the legal fees, and the surveying fees. Then there’s the cost of finding somewhere new to live. On second thoughts maybe I shouldn’t’ sell. Uh-oh, here we go again.

a.jarvis@independent.co.uk

Independent Partners; Do you need financial advice on your investments, pension or insurance? Book a free consultation with an independent Financial Adviser at VouchedFor.co.uk

Finacial products from our partners
Property search
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Money & Business

    Recruitment Genius: Sales Adviser - OTE £24,500

    £22500 - £24500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Inbound and outbound calls with...

    Recruitment Genius: Business Development Executive / Sales - OTE £40,000

    £18000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This fast growing Insurance Bro...

    Guru Careers: Research Associate / Asset Management Research Analyst

    £40 - 45k (DOE) + Benefits: Guru Careers: A Research Associate / Research Anal...

    Ashdown Group: Chief Technology Officer (CTO) - Glasgow

    £90000 - £98000 per annum + benefits : Ashdown Group: A truly exciting opportu...

    Day In a Page

    Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

    Solved after 200 years

    The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
    Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

    Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

    Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
    Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

    Sunken sub

    Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
    Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

    Age of the selfie

    Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
    Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

    Not so square

    How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
    Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

    Still carrying the torch

    The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
    The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

    The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

    ...but history suggests otherwise
    The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

    The bald truth

    How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
    Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

    Tour de France 2015

    Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
    Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

    A new beginning for supersonic flight?

    Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
    I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

    I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

    Latest on the Labour leadership contest
    Froome seals second Tour de France victory

    Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

    Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
    Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

    The uses of sarcasm

    'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
    A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

    No vanity, but lots of flair

    A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
    Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

    In praise of foraging

    How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food