Recruiters look for mini versions of themselves when hiring, new study finds

Managers tend to hire candidates on visual, cultural and demographic factors which will have no real impact on their job performance

Click to follow
The Independent Online

Do not worry about your job experience, a new report by the CIPD finds that recruiters look for "mini versions of themselves" and make recruitment decisions based on ‘gut instinct’ rather than on your achievements.

According to A Head for Hiring: The Behavioural Science of Recruitment,  a report by the professional body for HR and people development, managers tend to hire candidates on visual, cultural and demographic factors which will have no real impact on their job performance.

Among other influences in hiring decisions both male and female bosses tend to favour men over women, managers will also look for ‘mini me’s’ – a person who looks, dresses and has similar hobbies to their own.

Evidence also suggests that the odds are against you if your interview is at the end of the working day and physical factors such as weight can affect how you will be rated in your overall assessment.

“We like to think we can spot talent, but insights from behavioural science show that our decision-making is actually highly prone to ‘sloppy thinking’ and bias.” Research Adviser at the CIPD, Jonny Gifford said.

 

The  CIPD reports makes a number of recommendations to ensure that employers have consistent and effective hiring practices.

“Regardless of the level of resources and techniques one has to work with, there are steps that employers and recruiters can take to ensure that candidates get a fair recruitment experience and that employers find the person that best fits the role,” Gifford added.

Comments