Train Kick Selfie Guy is set to scoop up to $250,000 thanks to his viral video - so how can you cash in on your candid moments?

Canadian Jared Frank could receive anything between $30,000 (£17,800) to $250,000 (£149,000) for his misfortune - and that's just his cut of advertising revenue from being viewed on YouTube

Unless you're a big-time celebrity indulging in a spot of product placement, it's unlikely you'll ever make any money from a selfie. Not so for Canadian Jared Frank, whose selfie-gone-wrong looks set to earn the 22-year-old a small fortune.

When Frank posed in front of a passing passenger train while on holiday in Peru, he took a video that captured him being kicked in the head by the foot of the train's driver. Since the 11-second video made its way on to YouTube just over a week ago, it has been viewed more than 24 million times. "Train Kick Selfie Guy" (as Frank can expect to be called for the foreseeable future) has gone viral.

And forget the pitiful £250 pay out that television shows such as You've Been Framed! offer for calamities caught on camera, Frank is predicted to receive anything between $30,000 (£17,800) to $250,000 (£149,000) for his misfortune.

And that's just his cut of advertising revenue from being viewed on YouTube; he could make even more from licensing agreements. On Monday, he signed with a California-based company called Jukin Media, which could broker additional deals for Frank, who hopes to use the money raised to go to film school.

But how exactly does a silly video filmed on an iPhone turn into hard cash? Whether it's a baby biting his brother's finger, a cat playing the piano, or a teenage boy hysterically defending Britney, if people are watching, there's money to be made.

Two years ago, YouTube launched a new revenue-sharing program that allows users to click a "monetise" button when they upload a new clip.

Should the user have enough of a following – their videos will each rack up more than a few thousand views – and they upload regularly, the site will consider making them a partner and begin to include ads prior to, and within, their clips. Creators will take home about half the advertising revenue. YouTube will be responsible for finding advertisers, but users can also approach sponsors themselves.

"If they can generate an audience, they can start making money," Tom Pickett, YouTube's vice president of global operations, told Business Week.

There are now more than one million channels from more than 30 countries earning revenue through the YouTube Partner Program, and partner revenue increased by 60 per cent in the past year.

Video creators can then make further sums when they are licensed to television shows to be played out (organised by companies such as Jukin). Today, viral videos are shown in news broadcasts and chat shows all over the world.

Read more: Teen tries to take selfie in front of train
Train kick selfie guy set to make up to $250,000

However, the real big bucks are to be made if third parties come calling (the stars of "Charlie Bit My Finger" have appeared in a Ragu advert and even sell their own range of merchandise, including mugs and T-shirts).

The highest earning YouTube star is Felix Kjellberg (aka Pewdiepie), a Swede whose clips commenting on video games reportedly earn him around $7m (£4.1m) a year (he boasts a total of 3.7 billion views).

Others who make up the top 10 include a Los Angeles-based comedian called Jenna Marbles (JennaMarbles) and yet another gamer, James Wilson Jr (UberHaxorNova).

Despite the rough-around-the-edges style of production, their videos look positively sophisticated next to one of some kid getting hit in the side of the head by a boot. But that's not to say that Frank can't turn his mishap into a media empire. Jukin itself has been quick to point out that "online monetisation and media licensing are highly variable, and nobody can predict what this video will earn over time".

Whatever Frank makes, it's sure to be better than a kick in the teeth.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Life and Style
Suited and booted in the Lanvin show at the Paris menswear collections
fashionParis Fashion Week
Arts and Entertainment
Kara Tointon and Jeremy Piven star in Mr Selfridge
tvActress Kara Tointon on what to expect from Series 3
Voices
Winston Churchill, then prime minister, outside No 10 in June 1943
voicesA C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
News
i100
News
An asteroid is set to pass so close to Earth it will be visible with binoculars
news
Arts and Entertainment
Benedict Cumberbatch has spoken about the lack of opportunities for black British actors in the UK
film
News
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Sauce Recruitment: Programme Sales Executive - Independent Distributor

£25000 - £28000 per annum + circa 28K + 20% bonus opportunity: Sauce Recruitme...

SThree: Talent Acquisition Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + OTE £45K: SThree: Are you an ambitious, money mot...

Guru Careers: Investment Writer / Stock Picker

Competitive (DOE): Guru Careers: A freelance Investment Writer / Stock Picker ...

Guru Careers: PPC Account Executive / Paid Search Executive

£20 - 24K + Benefits: Guru Careers: An enthusiastic PPC Account / Paid Search ...

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project